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ANNUAL REPORT 2014

WHAT IS AIME?

AIME logo

AIME IS A STRUCTURED EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM PROVIDED FOR INDIGENOUS KIDS TO ACCESS THROUGHOUT THEIR HIGH SCHOOLING EXPERIENCE. STUDENTS COMPLETING THE PROGRAM ARE PROVEN TO FINISH SCHOOL AND TRANSITION THROUGH TO UNIVERSITY, FURTHER EDUCATION, TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT AT THE SAME RATE AS EVERY AUSTRALIAN CHILD – EFFECTIVELY CLOSING THE GAP


Aime CEO image

CEO REPORT

It was another momentous year for our organisation. From the world’s first mentoring session in the sky, to winning the Google Impact Challenge and again most importantly to seeing thousands of AIME kids step up to deliver the promise that Indigenous=Success. Many special moments littered the AIME skyline over the last 12 months – which the Chair’s report touches on in great detail and this Annual Report brings to life.

Very rarely in one’s life do you have the chance to be part of something truly great. Every day I get that opportunity. It is not something that I, or the team, take lightly.

We stand on the shoulders of giants who have come before us.

With wonder, spirit and respect for our forefathers, out of the fire, we are watching a new generation of giants being born.

Let’s keep it burning.

Jack Manning Bancroft
CEO, AIME

An Introduction from AIME’s CEO

Aime Chairman image

CHAIRMAN'S REPORT

In every conversation at AIME we start from a position of optimism, with a mindset of opportunity, always looking to unlock potential and aim higher than we ever thought possible.

Every Indigenous child matters. Every relationship and every conversation has the chance to build a better future. It is not a numbers game yet numbers can tell part of the AIME story and give us confidence to maintain our determination and enthusiasm. For example, in 2014 there were more than 4,400 mentees and 1,500 mentors, working with 16 universities and 314 high schools across the nation, supported by 100 staff including 36 Indigenous presenters. A lot of people are seriously committed to the positive difference AIME is making.

As you will read in this Annual Report, from this foundation the Indigenous kids in the AIME program made remarkable progress:

  • Near perfect scores for progression rates from Years 7 to 10
  • 94.8% progressed from Year 10 to Year 11 - higher than Australia’s non-Indigenous rate of 94.7%
  • 87.6% progressed from Year 11 to Year 12 - just below Australia’s non-Indigenous rate of 88.1%
  • 93.2% of the Year 12 cohort completed Year 12 - 6.7% above Australia’s non-Indigenous rate of 86.5% and 34.7% above the Indigenous rate of 58.5%
  • 30.9% of Year 12 graduates transitioned to university in 2015 (thus far)
In light of those results, and on behalf of the AIME Board, I would like to thank our mentors, our university partners, our high school partners, our corporate partners, the Federal Government and many other generous individuals and groups who made important contributions to AIME in 2014.

Our auditors KPMG, whose own generous support is acknowledged, calculated that the monetary value of in-kind support given to AIME in 2014 was an extraordinary $4.0 million.

The year was also filled with terrific external activities and results like winning the Google Impact Challenge, taking place in AIME High, launching AIME’s Got Game and farewelling Strut the Streets.

Yet we were especially encouraged to be recognised as a finalist in the 2014 Indigenous Governance Awards - this was a tribute to the efforts of the entire AIME team, particularly our dedicated staff working “back of house”, often unnoticed, to ensure everything runs smoothly. Just as every Indigenous kid counts, so do the efforts of each and every AIME staff member and they should be very proud of their efforts.

AIME now has a life of its own: every morning, people wake up across Australia believing in a better future because of it. The ripple is becoming an unstoppable wave of energy and success, not only for Indigenous Australians but for all Australians.

So while we would like to say a huge thank you for your support to date, we ask that you continue to walk with us as AIME makes one of the biggest contributions to closing the gap in Australian history.

Please enjoy our 2014 Annual Report!

Geoff Lovell
Chairman, AIME


HISTORICAL NATIONAL OUTCOMES

AIME 2009AIME 2010AIME 2011AIME 2012AIME 2013AIME 2014
YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS
88.O%88.O%97.0%98.6%97.6%99.6%
YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS
81.O%87.O%92.6%93.6%93.2%94.8%
YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS
92.O%86.O%79.0%84.7%89.7%87.6%
YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT
73.0%100%87.5%91.1%93.2%93.2%
YEAR 12
UNIVERSITY
TRANSITIONS
38.0%38.0%35.7%31.0%26.8%30.9%

AIME students have raised the bar, turned the tide on educational outcomes and are showing Australia that ‘Indigenous equals Success’. And this isn’t an overnight sensation, it has been building for some time.

As we have scaled the program from 325 mentees in 2009 to 3373 in 2014, we are proud that our students have continued to achieve strong results and are entering university, further education, training and employment at record numbers.

Over the past six years, our students have consistently and significantly achieved higher grade progression, higher Year 12 attainment and higher university transition rates than their Indigenous peers.

Note: In the years 2009-2013, AIME did not offer modules for Years 7 and 8, however, in 2014, 99.4% of AIME Year 7 students progressed to Year 8, and 98.9% of AIME Year 8 students progressed to Year 9.


AIME 2014 SITES

AIME 2014 SITES image

NATIONAL REPORT

At AIME, we believe that every single student’s life and educational journey counts, and we measure, record and report on these accordingly. Each year, we not only work extremely hard with the students in our program, we work hard with our partner schools and research partners so we can measure the outcomes of the program in the most accurate and comprehensive way possible.

The entire AIME program equates to a six-year course, comprising of 49 unique modules designed for all different year levels. When a student engages in the AIME program throughout their schooling career, they get the opportunity to access 156 hours of mentoring and academic support.

Although time intensive, we pride ourselves on tracking every single student’s journey through the AIME program as well as continuing to work with students after they graduate from Year 12, with the goal of landing them in a positive post-school pathway.

In 2014, we worked with schools and universities in Queensland, New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia. We experienced another big year of growth with a 61% increase on AIME participation (from 2,789 students in 2013 to 4,484 students in 2014) and a 98% increase on the number of students engaged in the program (from 1,911 in 2013 to 3,773 in 2014).

As our emergence in new locations continues, our roots in our established locations deepen and our student numbers continue to grow, we are proud to present our national outcomes showcasing yet another year of Indigenous success.

Our junior high school students are progressing through school on parity with non-Indigenous students and our senior high school students are progressing through school at close to parity with non-Indigenous students.

Our Year 12 students completing school are leading the way on meeting the COAG target of halving the gap in Year 12 attainment, by surpassing the national non-Indigenous rate by 6.71 percentage points and the national Indigenous rate by 34.7 percentage points for a second year in a row.

AIME students are also leading the way in closing the gap on post-school pathways into university, further education and training and employment. As of March 2015, 73% of AIME Year 12 students have already transitioned into positive post-school pathways, approximately 33 percentage points above the national Indigenous rate of 40%2. As we continue to work alongside the remainder of our Year 12 graduates, we hope to surpass the national non-Indigenous rate of 75%.

We hope you enjoy reading the national outcomes and join us in celebrating the success of the AIME class of 2014.


  1. Source: based on Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision data, Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage 2014, page 20.
  2. Source: based on Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision data, Overcoming Indigenous Disadvantage 2014, page 43.

MENTEES AND MENTORS

4,484 1,526 INDIGENOUS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS VOLUNTEER UNIVERSITY STUDENT MENTORS

ACROSS
• QUEENSLAND • NEW SOUTH WALES • THE AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY • VICTORIA • SOUTH AUSTRALIA AND • WESTERN AUSTRALIA


UNIVERSITIES AND SCHOOLS

SIXTEEN & AIME WORKED WITH UNIVERSITIES
THREE HUNDRED & THIRTEEN HIGHSCHOOLS AROUND AUSTRALIA

NEW UNIVERSITIES

IN 2014 WE WELCOMED THE AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY AND THE UNIVERSITY OF CANBERRA TO KICK OFF THE PROGRAM IN THE ACT, THE UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME IN FREMANTLE WA AND EXPANDED TO GIPPSLAND, VIC THROUGH FEDERATION UNIVERSITY AUSTRALIA’S CAMPUS AND BATEMANS BAY, NSW THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG’S CAMPUS

new sites map

UNIVERSITY TRANSITIONS

30.9% OF YEAR 12 GRADUATES IN THE AIME PROGRAM TRANSITIONED TO A UNIVERSITY PATHWAY, COMMENCING THEIR STUDIES IN 2015

HOURS OF SUPPORT

28,400 HOURS OF FREE SUPPORT WAS GIVEN TO AIME KIDS BY VOLUNTEER MENTORS ACROSS AUSTRALIA


NATIONAL OUTCOMES

At AIME, we track students using actual data and measurements. The closest comparative national data that we can currently obtain is based on apparent data or uses different age ranges. We are currently working on a way to have more closely aligned comparative statistics.

The data below celebrates the outcomes of our students and provides comparison to how AIME students are doing compared to national statistics. This data is made more significant by the fact that 65% of our students attend schools that are below the average (1000) according to the Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) value system.

The average weighted (ICSEA) value of AIME students in 2014 was 968. Some typical AIME schools, with an ICSEA value similar to this are:

  • Albion Park High School, NSW, (965)
  • Cannington Community College, WA, (969)
  • Drouin Secondary College, VIC, (967)
  • Mulwaree High School, ACT, (970)
  • Nerang State High School, QLD, (967)
  • Salisbury East High School, SA, (965)

KPMG have performed independent assurance procedures over the progression percentage rates in accordance with the definitions set out in this Annual Report.


YEAR 7-10 PROGRESSION RATES


YEAR 7-8 PROGRESSIONS

356/358
STUDENTS
PROGRESSED

99.4%


YEAR 8-9 PROGRESSIONS

562/568
STUDENTS
PROGRESSED

98.9%


YEAR 9-10 PROGRESSIONS

936/940
STUDENTS
PROGRESSED

99.6%


YEAR 10-12 PROGRESSION RATES

In 2014, AIME’s senior high school students continued to strive for success, progressing through school at close to parity with non-Indigenous kids.


YEAR 10-11 PROGRESSIONS

94.7%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

82.9%

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

94.8%

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

745/786
STUDENTS
PROGRESSED

94.8%

Of the 41 students who did not progress into Year 11, 8 are repeating Year 10 and 18 completed Year 10 and are school leavers moving into employment or further education and training.


YEAR 11-12 PROGRESSIONS

88.1%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

73.1%

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

87.6%

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

475/542
STUDENTS
PROGRESSED

87.6%

Of the 67 students who did not progress into Year 12, 15 are repeating Year 11 and 27 completed Year 11 and are school leavers moving into employment or further education and training.


YEAR 12 ATTAINMENT RATES


86.5%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

58.5%

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

93.2%

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

369/396
STUDENTS
PROGRESSED

93.2%

Of the 27 students who did not complete Year 12, 9 are repeating Year 12 and 8 are school leavers moving into employment or further education and training.


YEAR 12 POSITIVE PATHWAYS

In 2014, 369 AIME Year 12 students satisfied the requirements of Year 12 attainment in their relevant state or territory. AIME has been working with these 369 students to ensure that they transition into positive post-school pathways. As of March 2015 the following positive pathways have been secured:

UNIVERSITY114

(INCLUDING 96 INTO BACHELOR DEGREES AND 18 INTO ACCREDITED UNIVERSITY PREPARATION COURSES)

FURTHER
EDUCATION/TRAINING83

(TAFE, TRAINEESHIPS, APPRENTICESHIPS, DEFENCE FORCE OR OTHER REGISTERED TRAINING ORGANISATIONS)

EMPLOYMENT72

(INCLUDING 9 WHO DEFERRED UNIVERSITY, 12 TAKING A GAP YEAR AND 4 ELITE SPORTS PATHWAYS)

We are continuing to support an additional 100 Year 12 graduates into positive post-school pathways.

AIME’S GOT GAME & AIME HIGH 2014

An Introduction from AIME’s CEO

In October 2014, AIME ran an online talent competition called AIME’s Got Game to showcase the fresh skills of 45 Indigenous Australian high school kids.

The top 45 were selected out of 1,500 participants who completed the AIME’s Got Game modules as part of the AIME Year 10 program, performing songs and dances of their choice. They represented a new generation of talented Indigenous youth.

Some of these kids were overcoming serious challenges to perform in front of a crowd. From the time the sessions were held in July to the launch of the campaign in October, it became clear that AIME’s Got Game would enable the students to send a message to Australia filled with positivity and success.

The performance of each student was filmed, whether they were dancing, singing, rapping or playing the trumpet. The videos were uploaded online for the top 5 ‘Vocalists’ and ‘Showstoppers’ to be decided by Australia’s voting public. As soon as AIME’s Got Game was live, the competition was running hot! The top 5 in each category changed daily.

Whole communities got behind the students, with some schools sending alerts out to parents, school staff and year groups reminding them to vote!

In Victoria, Tobi, Cara, Keeley and Madeline from Loreto College Ballarat were consistently in the top 5. On the second last day of voting, they dropped out, but managed to rally some extra support from their community and finished 3rd in the vocalists category. They even organised their own radio interview!

The students, who attended the AIME program at Federation University Australia, performed the traditional Torres Strait Islander song, Taba Naba, which Tobi learned from her mother. They also taught the song to their peers during a school assembly earlier this year.

For Tobi, who is Torres Strait Islander, the competition was an opportunity to deepen her connection with her culture and share a part of her people’s story with her peers.

Sixteen students representing communities in Perth, Ipswich, Ballarat, Canberra, Coffs Harbour, Yeppoon, Fremantle and Helensvale were flown to Sydney in December to work with industry mentors, perform to huge crowds, light up our imaginations and record the official AIME Anthem for 2014.

Furthermore, all sixteen students took part in the first ever sky high mentoring session, AIME High, aboard a Virgin Australia chartered flight. Checked in by Virgin Australia’s crew of Indigenous staff, the kids received their one of a kind boarding passes: a round trip from Sydney to Sydney. They soared to 30,000 feet while being mentored by some of Australia’s most influential celebrity mentors, including Lionel Cole, Jeremy Marou and Triple J National Indigenous Music Award winners in 2013 and 2014, Robbie Miller and Philly.

During the flight, Caitie Hughes from Rockhampton delivered a stunning performance over the PA system.

Caitie, from Yepoon State High School received more than 14,300 votes and placed first in the vocalists category with her rendition of Sam Smith’s, ‘Stay With Me’.

For some of the kids, it was their first time on a plane, which only made it even more magical. Bailey, who comes from Kwinana near Perth, had only flown once as an infant and wasn’t old enough to remember it.

The showstoppers spent the next day with Bangarra Dance Theatre. Coached by Bangarra’s Youth Program Director, Sidney Saltner and his team, they choreographed a dance to be performed later that day. Meanwhile, the vocalists headed into workshops with Song Division to lay down the AIME Anthem for 2014.

That night, the kids headlined at AIME’s inaugural Gala Ball. They performed the AIME Anthem in front of almost 350 people. Nathaniel from Ballarat led the trumpet solo and the ‘Showstoppers’ tore up the dance floor.

Friday morning saw the kids backing up for a third day by filming a video clip to capture their journey over the past three days. They made their way over to Sydney’s Martin Place wrapping up a huge few days by performing the AIME Anthem in front of a swimsuit clad crowd at AIME’s last ever Strut the Streets.

With the support of their mentors, the AIME’s Got Game kids choreographed a dance routine and recorded a unique song. They did it in five hours. And they performed it to over a thousand people across two days.

It just goes to show that if you AIME High, anything is possible!


STRUT THE STREETS

In 2009, AIME had its back to the wall and was in desperate need of funding. Something big needed to be done to continue to help Indigenous students finish school and progress to university, further education, training and employment at the same rate as every Australian child.

That’s when Jack Manning Bancroft and AIME Finance Director Adam Linforth had a lightbulb moment. It was a risk, they thought, but it might just be the ticket to get AIME through a tight spot. That year, Strut the Streets was born.

Strut the Streets has done us proud. It brought hundreds of people together over six years and raised over half a million dollars to help grow the program from NSW to QLD and VIC, and then on to WA, SA and most recently, the ACT.

Together, we proudly braved a path that many feared to tread. We strutted where no man or woman had strut before. Sydney’s Martin Place had never seen such boldness until the swimwear clad strutters made their way through the open amphitheatre. We covered hundreds of metres, smuggled thousands of budgies and raised much needed funds for AIME to reach more Indigenous kids across Australia.

But after six years, it was time to grow up, and as all good things must come to an end, we decided that 2014 would see the last ever Strut the Streets.

In December 2014, hundreds of people gathered in Martin Place for one final strut. As we attempted to break the Guinness World Record for the largest swimwear parade, the AIME’s Got Game kids took to the stage for a stellar performance. We didn’t quite make the record, but we raised over $55k for AIME and had a whole lot of laughs in the process!

As the sun set on Strut the Streets, there was a feeling of excitement and wonder about what might come next.

Onwards and upwards!


NATIONAL HOODIE DAY

OVER $121,000 WAS RAISEDTO SUPPORT MORE INDIGENOUS KIDS TO FINISH SCHOOL AT THE SAME RATE AS EVERY AUSTRALIAN CHILD AND BRING US CLOSER TO WORKING WITH 10,000 INDIGENOUS KIDS ACROSS AUSTRALIA BY 2018. IN 2014, AIME ENCOURAGED PEOPLE TO PUT AIME ON THE MAP BY TAKING A PHOTO IN THEIR HOODIE AND POSTING IT TO SOCIAL MEDIA TO BE IN THE RUNNING FOR SOME PRETTY COOL PRIZES. WE SAW HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE, SOME DOGS AND EVEN A CAT, DON A HOODIE AND POST SOME PRETTY CREATIVE PHOTOS.


GALA BALL

THE INAUGURAL AIME GALA BALL WAS HELD ON THE FOURTH OF DECEMBER IN THE BALLROOM AT THE IVY IN SYDNEY. 350 PEOPLE IN AN ARRAY OF COLOURFUL COSTUMES ATTENDED THE EVENT, WHICH RAISED OVER $100,000 TO GET AIME CLOSER TO REACHING 10,000 KIDS BY 2018.


SOCIAL MEDIA GROWTH

AIME’S SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENCE EXPANDED, GROWING FROM 40,164 FOLLOWERS ON FACEBOOK IN JANUARY 2014 TO 63,265 IN JANUARY 2015. IN THE SAME PERIOD, WE GREW OUR TWITTER FOLLOWERS FROM 3,209 TO 4,629 AND EXPANDED OUR REACH ON INSTAGRAM AND YOUTUBE. FACEBOOK CONTINUED TO GROW AS AIME’S MOST ENGAGED AUDIENCE ON SOCIAL MEDIA WITH AN AVERAGE WEEKLY REACH OF 300,000 PEOPLE. GIVEN THE READERSHIP OF THE AUSTRALIAN IS JUST OVER 330,000, WE ARE RIVALLING AUSTRALIA’S BIGGEST NEWSPAPERS FOR THE AMOUNT OF EYES THAT SEE OUR CONTENT. AIME’S FACEBOOK PAGE IS DRIVEN BY STORIES OF THE KIDS, POSITIVE AND FEEL-GOOD CONTENT, AND INSPIRATIONAL INDIGENOUS LEGENDS.


GOOGLE IMPACT CHALLENGE

AIME WAS ONE OF FOUR WINNERS OF THE GOOGLE IMPACT CHALLENGE IN OCTOBER 2014. A $500,000 GRANT WAS AWARDED, WHICH WILL SEE OUR YEAR 7 AND 8, ‘KNOWLEDGE IS POWER’ PROJECT BECOME A REALITY. THE PROJECT AIMS TO MAKE MATHS AND SCIENCE COOL FOR YOUNG INDIGENOUS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.


RESEARCH

OUR RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG CONTINUES TO INVESTIGATE AND DEMONSTRATE THE IMPACT OF THE AIME PROGRAM. 2014 WAS A BIG YEAR FOR DATA COLLECTION, WITH OVER 300 HOURS OF FIELDWORK CONDUCTED AT AIME SITES ACROSS AUSTRALIA, MORE THAN 150 INTERVIEWS COMPLETED AND MORE THAN 2,500 SURVEYS COMPLETED BY MENTEES AND MENTORS. TWO PAPERS FROM THIS RESEARCH HAVE ALREADY BEEN PUBLISHED AND THE TEAM ARE CURRENTLY WORKING ON MORE.


INDIGENOUS GOVERNANCE AWARDS

FROM A FIELD OF 113 DIVERSE ORGANISATIONS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY, AIME WAS SELECTED AS ONE OF THE EIGHT FINALISTS FOR THE INDIGENOUS GOVERNANCE AWARDS.


SITE OUTCOMES

The following pages outline the 2014 outcomes for each AIME site. Universities are listed in alphabetical order.


australian national university & university of canberra

AIME is such an important and successful program that makes a real difference to the lives and future of many Indigenous students. It is a great opportunity to be able to participate in AIME at ANU so I would like to thank everyone involved in making this happen in Canberra universities.

-mentor, australian capital territory, 2014

AIME taught us that we can do anything.

-year 10 mentee, australian capital territory, 2014

The best thing I have done at AIME is putting my fear of public speaking aside and getting up to speak in front of heaps of people, which is something I would never have done. It really gave me some confidence.

-year 12 mentee, australian capital territory, 2014

AIME helped me become more organised, helped me set goals and made me want to strive towards getting better marks at school.

-year 11 mentee, australian capital territory, 2014


The inaugural year of AIME in the ACT saw surrounding NSW schools from Yass to Queanbeyan join students from 12 schools in the nation’s capital and participate in the program alongside 68 university mentors. The model of universities working collaboratively in this region has provided mentees with access to the best array of opportinities for the future. A solid base has been established in 2014 that will be built on in future years.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

11/11

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

8/8

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

22/23

95.7%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

21/23

94.7%

82.9%

91.3%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

15/18

88.1%

73.1%

83.3%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

5/6

86.5%

58.5%

83.3%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

82

Total number
of students

89


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 01
  • Employment | 03*
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 02
*including 1 student who did not finish year 12

aime brisbane

At AIME, I learnt to go to school everyday because it is important and you’ll regret it later on in the future if you don’t.

-year 9 mentee, queensland, 2014

The best thing at AIME is when people tell their story. They are always really inspiring.

-year 9 mentee, queensland, 2014

AIME is helping me achieve and get better grades. I have become better at speaking in front of groups and have learnt to have no shame.

-year 11 mentee, queensland, 2014

The mentors have taught me to follow through with my dreams and to work hard even if the situation is difficult. I feel a lot more confident with sharing my opinions and ideas now.

-year 11 mentee, queensland, 2014


The mentees in Brisbane had the unique experience of participating in a program based out of Virgin Australia’s Headquarters. 59 mentors participated from a range of local universities as well as Virgin staff to deliver some of the strongest Year 12 completion rates in the country.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

N/A*

*There was no Year 7 program in 2014


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

28/28

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

41/41

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

34/35

94.7%

82.9%

97.1%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

27/33

88.1%

73.1%

81.8%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

24/25

86.5%

58.5%

96.0%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

154

Total number
of students

162


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 05
  • Employment | 05*
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 06
*including 1 student who did not finish year 12

bond university & southern cross university

gold coast

The best thing I did at AIME was talking about my future, knowing I have support and figuring out a path after high school.

-year 12 mentee, queensland, 2014

The mentors taught us that our future is important for not only us but the younger generation to be able to mentor them to have a better future so they can go to uni or TAFE.

-year 12 mentee, queensland, 2014

Thanks AIME team you have made AIME truly special and you now have a special place in my heart, which I will cherish forever even when I leave uni I will look back at my AIME days and say that was the best fun I had in ages.

-mentor, queensland, 2014

After AIME, I now know that school can help me get somewhere in life and that dreams do come true.

-year 12 mentee, queensland, 2014


Students in the Gold Coast and Tweed regions progressed through school and completed Year 12 at a higher rate than non-Indigenous students at every year level. This is with a relatively large cohort of 251 students and testament to the hard work of staff and mentors based at Bond and the ever-growing SCU Gold Coast campus.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

29/29

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

55/55

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

58/58

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

38/40

94.7%

82.9%

95.0%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

32/33

88.1%

73.1%

97.0%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

35/36

86.5%

58.5%

97.2%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

247

Total number
of students

251


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 10
  • Employment | 08
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 12
Including 1 student repeating year 12

central queensland university

AIME has definitely helped me and made me more determined to get my studies done and get better marks in my assignments.

-year 11 mentee, queensland, 2014

The best thing I have been involved with at AIME is when visitors come in and speak about their lives and about how they got to where they are now.

-year 11 mentee, queensland, 2014

AIME has inspired me to focus on school and get a better job. It also reduces my stress about homework and other school things that stress me out.

-year 11 mentee, queensland, 2014

AIME means a lot to me. It has helped me out so much, especially the friendly mentors that boost my confidence.

-year 10 mentee, queensland, 2014


In our second year at Rockhampton the number of mentees grew from 52 to 81 while achieving improved Year 12 completion results that are ahead of non-Indigenous students. The first two progressions of AIME students to university has also been achieved. There is a relatively low mentor base with university students mainly studying remotely but a dedicated group of 16 mentors alongside local staff has built some of the strongest progression results in the country.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

N/A

*There was no Year 7 program in 2014


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

12/12

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

23/23

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

17/18

94.7%

82.9%

94.4%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

12/13

88.1%

73.1%

92.3%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

14/15

86.5%

58.5%

93.3%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

78

Total number
of students

81


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 02
  • Employment | 03
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 07*
*Including 1 student who did not finish year 12

curtin university

AIME has been extremely positive for my students, since AIME started in 2013, we have not heard the word shame (which was once a common occurrence) around the school, it’s obvious that there has been a huge change in students’ confidence. One student who was painfully shy, has now put herself up for a role as School Captain, and is in a leadership position.

-Principal, western australia, 2014

AIME helped me to find a pathway to my dream job.

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014

AIME means a lot to me! Words can’t explain how lucky I feel about being here.

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014

At AIME, I have learnt to be a better leader, to have no shame and to talk to my teacher to get more help.

-year 11 mentee, western australia, 2014


In the second year at Curtin University there was a significant improvement in school progression rates with AIME mentees now outperforming non-Indigenous students at every year level from Year 9 onwards. This is with a large cohort of 381 students. University entries doubled from 3 to 6 with this number set to increase further when the large cohorts of Year 9 & 10 students graduate from Year 12.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

N/A

*There was no Year 7 program in 2014


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

91/93

97.8%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

98/98

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

88/90

94.7%

82.9%

97.8%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

59/65

88.1%

73.1%

90.8%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

34/35

86.5%

58.5%

97.1%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

370

Total number
of students

381*

*32 of these students identified as participating in the Follow the Dream Program (1 in Year 8, 7 in Year 9, 12 in Year 10, 9 in Year 11 & 3 in Year 12). Post Year 12 Positive Pathways 8 of these students identified as participating in a Clontarf Academy (4 in Year 9 & 4 in Year 10).


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 06
  • Employment | 15
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 09*
*including 1 student who did not finish year 12

edith cowan university

AIME has given me an outlet to express myself without feeling shame. I have become more confident identifying as Aboriginal. Before I came to AIME, I wasn’t confident enough to call myself Aboriginal but AIME helped me see that you are who you are no matter what anyone says.

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014

At AIME, I got a better understanding of what university was like and what I could do if I went there. We got to see the university and ask people all about their experiences there.

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014

AIME gave me confidence to believe that I could get into uni and achieve my goals. It gave me the stepping stones to plan my journey in life. I always knew I wanted to help people and have seen the disparity of Indigenous health. I feel by becoming a nurse I can help bridge the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health outcomes.

-year 12 mentee, western australia, 2014

AIME has opened up a lot of networks that will be beneficial for my future.

-year 12 mentee, western australia, 2014


2014 saw strong progression results with the standout performers being the Year 12 cohort. All students completed Year 12 and 6 of the 12 students have progressed to university. This is an increase from 1 in the previous year. The program is delivered out of the Joondalup and Mt Lawley campuses and in 2015 will grow to the Bunbury campus of the University.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

3/4

75.0%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

7/7

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

35/36

97.2%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

27/29

94.7%

82.9%

93.1%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

17/21

88.1%

73.1%

81.0%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

12/12

86.5%

58.5%

100%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

101

Total number
of students

109*

*15 of these students identified as participating in the Follow the Dream Program (5 in Year 9, 4 in Year 10, 5 in Year 11 & 1 in Year 12). 1 of these students identified as participating in a Clontarf Academy (1 in Year 11).


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 06
  • Employment | 01
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 04

federation university australia

ballarat

A very BIG thank you for all you’ve done on behalf of not just the students you’ve worked with, but their families, friends and community members. I have been in awe of what you have accomplished.

-teacher, victoria, 2014

The AIME mentors are just so inspiring and happy and encouraging and passionate.

-year 9 mentee, victoria, 2014

Because of AIME we have been able to come out of our comfort zone and we have been able to do stuff like AIME’s Got Game and getting up in front of people without being judged or laughed at even if we made a mistake. (In AIME there is no shame.) For me AIME has given me a lot of confidence and a chance for me to get out there and be myself around the other students, mentors and Kesos (Koorie Engagement Support Officer).

-year 9 mentee, victoria, 2014


The second year in Ballarat saw the program grow from 23 to 70 mentees and the strongest progression rates in the country. The stand out result is all Year 12 students completing Year 12 and progressing to either university, further education, training or employment.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

12/12

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

10/10

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

16/16

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

12/12

94.7%

82.9%

100%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

11/12

88.1%

73.1%

91.7%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

8/8

86.5%

58.5%

100%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

69

Total number
of students

70


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 03
  • Employment | 03

federation university australia

gippsland

The mentees have taught me so much. They have taught me about the Aboriginal community in Broome, WA, and how they live on the Ballarat campus in order to further their education. They have also taught me that Aboriginal culture is still richly thriving and how important knowledge of this and respect is.

-mentor, victoria, 2014

The mentees have taught me to open my eyes to the wider community; they have taught me more about diversity and have given me first-hand experience in mentoring and working with students from the Indigenous background and community.

-mentor, victoria, 2014

It makes me feel very excited and positive about the future when I see what great work the AIME team do!

-teacher, victoria, 2014


2014 was the inaugural year of this program. The priority for the year was building relationships with schools and community, similar to what was established at the campus the previous year.

While participation numbers are relatively low this year, progression rates were reasonable and there is a base of mentors and students to build on in 2015.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

15/15

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

9/9

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

5/5

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

4/6

94.7%

82.9%

66.7%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

5/7

88.1%

73.1%

71.4%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

1/1

86.5%

58.5%

100%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

39

Total number
of students

43


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 00
  • Employment | 00

monash university

AIME helped me stay in school. I had a bit of a rough time this year in school and ... AIME helped me through that and helped me get back into the swing of things with school.

-year 11 mentee, victoria, 2014

I was always scared to admit that I was of Aboriginal heritage because I used to get picked on about it but since I’ve been here it’s amazing.

-year 9 mentee, victoria, 2014

AIME is very informative and very inspirational and it motivates you to get out there and, you know, give your best.

-year 11 mentee, victoria, 2014

AIME just changes your whole outlook on life.

-year 11 mentee, victoria, 2014


In its fifth year at Monash University, the program is now firmly established. While local schools typically have a lower proportion of Indigenous students than other regions they punch above their weight in terms of university progressions. The Year 10 to 11 transition was slightly below national averages but all of these students are on positive pathways with one in an apprenticeship, one in employment, one at TAFE and the other two repeating Year 10.

This year, 8 of 10 Year 12 students progressed to university.This is more than double the average for non-Indigenous students.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

6/6

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

11/12

91.7%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

17/17

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

23/28

94.7%

82.9%

82.1%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

15/18

88.1%

73.1%

83.3%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

9/10

86.5%

58.5%

90.0%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

81

Total number
of students

91


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 08
  • Employment | 01*
*including 1 student who did not finish Year 12

murdoch university

The mentors taught me that university is important and it is not as hard as it seems.

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014

Thank you! You guys are awesome and have taught me so much, I have learnt so many skills that I can apply to our community and teach others.

-mentor, western australia, 2014

My mentor has taught me that there is no shame at AIME and that you can achieve anything if you just put your head to it and try.

-year 11 mentee, western australia, 2014

AIME is one of the best things that happened to me. I met lots of people and got involved in social activities with other schools. It gave me the courage and strength to get over some things in high school and confidence when it comes to public speaking.

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014


Our second year at Murdoch saw 100% progression rates across all year groups with the exception of Year 11 students. Of the five students who did not progress to Year 12, 3 are repeating, 1 has an apprenticeship and one is in employment. With a large year 9 cohort progressing through to Year 12, the progressions to university, further education and employment are set to grow significantly in the coming years.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

N/A

*There was no Year 7 program in 2014


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

20/20

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

51/51

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

23/23

94.7%

82.9%

100%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

15/20

88.1%

73.1%

75.0%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

8/8

86.5%

58.5%

100%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

117

Total number
of students

122*

*17 of these students identified as also participating in the Follow the Dream Program (10 in Year 9, 1 in Year 10, 2 in Year 11 & 4 in Year 12).


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 01
  • Employment | 00
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 03

rmit university

AIME taught me how to connect with young students. They have so much potential and it’s awesome seeing them come out of their shells, build their confidence, believe in themselves and want to work hard for a better and brighter future.

-mentor, victoria, 2014

The mentees have taught me a lot, and to summarise it all, I think they taught me that nothing is impossible, even when things in life are difficult.

-mentor, victoria, 2014

The mentors taught me to not give up, thrive through education and to be confident in who I am.

-year 11 mentee, victoria, 2014

I feel the best thing I did at AIME was to get out of my comfort zone and talk to people I‘ve never met before. I am now better at putting my hand up more and asking more questions and know how important it is to finish school.

-year 11 mentee, victoria, 2014


RMIT maintained strong progression results in 2014 with 71 university mentors supporting 118 local Indigenous high school students. RMIT was a popular choice of university in Victoria for AIME mentees with 7 progressing directly into RMIT for 2015.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

23/23

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

11/11

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

30/30

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

16/17

94.7%

82.9%

94.1%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

17/19

88.1%

73.1%

89.5%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

15/18

86.5%

58.5%

83.3%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

112

Total number
of students

118


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 04
  • Employment | 06*
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 04*
*INCLUDING 1 STUDENT WHO DID NOT FINISH YEAR 12
*INCLUDING 1 STUDENT WHO DID NOT FINISH YEAR 12
1 STUDENT REPEATING YEAR 12

southern cross university

coffs harbour

The tutoring has been great. I have gotten better at Maths and I have gotten better at putting more hours in for my homework and study. AIME has also helped me embrace my culture and show me that I can work just as hard as anyone in my school and achieve my goals.

-year 10 mentee, new south wales, 2014

AIME has given me the idea that I want to go to uni.

-year 11 mentee, new south wales, 2014

The best thing I did at AIME was the drama session. I thought I couldn’t do it but I got over being shame and I did it and had the best day.

-year 9 mentee, new south wales, 2014

AIME has really made me really determined to just go and become an early childhood teacher and go and do the things I want to do.

-year 12 mentee, new south wales, 2014


Coffs Harbour is one of the three Southern Cross University campuses that AIME operates from and 2014 saw solid progression but with some room for improvement in 2015. While Coffs Harbour has the lowest university student population of the campuses, a committed group of 25 mentors as well as local community members are dedicated to achieving educational success for the kids in this region. There is a large and growing number of Indigenous high school students, particularly in the lower years of high school and in 2015 we are increasing our local staffing presence to maximise the opportunities and support we’re able to provide for these kids.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

34/34

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

30/31

96.8%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

42/42

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

25/27

94.7%

82.9%

92.6%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

14/16

88.1%

73.1%

87.5%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

15/15

86.5%

58.5%

100%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

160

Total number
of students

165


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 02
  • Employment | 01
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 04

southern cross university

lismore

It was so good getting to meet and interact with the kids, and seeing what a positive change we could make as mentors. Seeing the Year 12 kids graduate their HSC, and seeing them do so well in their speeches was really uplifting.

-mentor, new south wales, 2014

It is great to see the mentees give it a go despite their initial hesitation. It really pays off and you see them grow and thrive within the program.

-mentor, new south wales, 2014

Our kids are talking about AIME more and more. I’m not going around to them asking them if they want to come to AIME, they’re coming up to me asking when the next session is. It’s starting to have an impact on our kids in regards to their pride in being Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander as well as wanting to stay in school until Year 12.

-teacher, new south wales, 2014


AIME mentee numbers grew from 118 to 216 students in 2014 with 46 mentors providing support to the local team. Importantly, progression results remained strong and 100% of Year 12 students progressed to university, further education, training or employment.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

44/44

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

38/38

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

50/50

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

41/44

94.7%

82.9%

93.2%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

18/23

88.1%

73.1%

78.3%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

16/17

86.5%

58.5%

94.1%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

207

Total number
of students

216


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 05
  • Employment | 03
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 00

the university of notre dame

Before AIME, I was thinking about going to uni but now that I’ve been involved in the program, it makes me definitely want to go to uni. There’s no shame at AIME. Don’t be ashamed of who you are or what your background is. I’d like to thank AIME for letting me know that I can do anything and for letting me know I can go on to university and do great things!

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014

AIME really inspired and motivated me to go to uni. I learnt that education is the key to success.

-year 9 mentee, western australia, 2014

It feels like we learn a lot from our mentees about culture, family, learning, friendship, how to have fun, and how to be brave. It’s an honour to have them come to the university so we can spend time working on their goals and growth together. Thanks for having AIME at Notre Dame! It’s my favourite day of the month.

-mentor, western australia, 2014

I have been impressed with the enthusiasm and dedication shown by all who are involved in this project. This is a well thought out and tightly managed service. The calibre of the mentors is to be commended. The difference the evening Tutor Squad has made to the students involved is exciting. The time the tutors freely give is greatly appreciated.

-teacher, western australia, 2014


2014 was the inaugural year of AIME at the University of Notre Dame. Similar to other Western Australian schools that we partnered with in 2013, there were relatively low Aboriginal enrolments in Years 11 and 12. The focus was on earlier years to build a cohort of Year 11 and 12 students for future years. There were 86 university mentors, which is a strong result in a debut year and reflected the enthusiasm and ethos of students at the university.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

N/A

*There was no Year 7 program in 2014


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

5/5

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

45/46

97.8%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

23/24

94.7%

82.9%

95.8%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

4/6

88.1%

73.1%

66.7%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

2/2

86.5%

58.5%

100%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

79

Total number
of students

83*

*7 of these students identified as participating in the Follow the Dream Program (6 in Year 9 & 1 in Year 10). 5 of these students identified as participating in a Clontarf Academy (5 in Year 9).


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 00
  • Employment | 00
  • *students we are still supporting into pathways | 02

university of south australia

Since coming to AIME, my grades have improved and I am getting to school on time and trying way harder in school and not being slack.

-year 9 mentee, south australia, 2014

AIME is teaching me and other kids in the program about how much effort we need to put in at school and how to take advantage of every opportunity that school is giving me.

-year 9 mentee, south australia, 2014

I love being part of AIME and I could not talk about it any more highly! The week leading up to the sessions I’m excited and the mornings when I get to put my hoodie on to go to work with these mentees, I love it! Especially because my mentee has really struggled to focus and the last session they came up to me and thanked me and said will you be here at uni next year? And I said, “Of course.”, and they said, “I’ll be here too then.” Oh so much joy.

-mentor, south australia, 2014

The mentees have taught me that there is great joy in helping other people.

-mentor, south australia, 2014


2014 saw the size of the program triple from 105 students to 308. This was in line with a growth in staffing from one full time staff member to three alongside several casual staff. Progression results remained steady through this process and the program was supported by 144 mentors. There were 8 progressions to university, which was a doubling in the number from the previous year.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

1/1

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

80/81

98.8%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

87/87

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

69/70

94.7%

82.9%

98.6%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

30/34

88.1%

73.1%

88.2%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

24/35

86.5%

58.5%

68.6%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

291

Total number
of students

308

2 of these students identified as participating in the Follow the Dream Program (2 in Year 10).


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 08
  • Employment | 05
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 09*
*INCLUDING 5 STUDENTS WHO DID NOT FINISH YEAR 12
5 STUDENTS ARE REPEATING YEAR 12

the university of sydney

Before AIME I was kind of scared and nervous about uni but coming here they really inspire us to go to uni and to achieve our best in high school.

-year 9 mentee, new south wales, 2014

I feel that the racism session was the best as it taught me how to handle situations with racism that I experience.

-year 9 mentee, new south wales, 2014

The mentors taught me how important it is to finish Year 12.

-year 9 mentee, new south wales, 2014

AIME was a confidence booster, and I made a lot of connections and helpful structures. My life is pretty much set up thanks to all of the people associated with the AIME teams.

-year 10 mentee, new south wales, 2014


This is our longest running program and similar to the University of Wollongong, shows what can be achieved after AIME is embedded in a community. AIME students outperformed non-Indigenous students with Year 12 completions 10% higher than for non-Indigenous students. 29 students progressed to university, which is the highest number from a single program in the country.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

74/74

100%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

55/55

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

136/137

99.3%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

120/128

94.7%

82.9%

93.8%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

94/105

88.1%

73.1%

89.5%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

72/74

86.5%

58.5%

97.3%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

551

Total number
of students

573

2 of these students identified as participating in the Follow the Dream Program (2 in Year 9).


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 29
  • Employment | 09
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 20
1 STUDENT REPEATING YEAR 12

university of the sunshine coast

The best part of AIME is listening and learning from mentors and guests. We are able to talk to them, ask questions and gain knowledge from each and every one.

-year 11 mentee, queensland, 2014

I went into AIME hoping to inspire the kids involved but I soon realised I would be the one to be inspired by the kids.

-mentor, queensland, 2014

The best thing I did at an AIME session was performing in front of others. I was NOT confident with it at first but then I did extremely well and feel like I can do more things now.

-year 9 mentee, queensland, 2014

AIME has been really good for me. I don’t have many friends since I have moved here and going to AIME makes me feel happier and helped me to not be so shy around new people. I even found that studying what you like can be fun.

-year 11 mentee, queensland, 2014


2014 saw steady participation numbers and strong progression rates with Indigenous students in the region progressing at the same or slightly higher rates than non-Indigenous students. There is a relatively large Year 10 cohort progressing through, which is likely to see a boost in Year 12 graduates in 2016.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

N/A

*There was no Year 7 program in 2014


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

15/16

93.8%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

30/30

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

42/44

94.7%

82.9%

95.5%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

22/25

88.1%

73.1%

88.0%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

17/18

86.5%

58.5%

94.4%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

126

Total number
of students

133


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 02
  • Employment | 04
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 09*
*INCLUDING 1 STUDENT WHO DID NOT FINISH YEAR 12

university of wollongong

We always had so much to do and learn as the AIME excursions were not only enjoyable but really informative. They have helped set my goals of becoming a nurse through discussing and developing my dreams and aspirations.

-year 12 mentee, new south wales, 2014

The mentors taught me that all goals are achievable if you put your mind to it.

-year 10 mentee, new south wales, 2014

I now have a stronger outlook on the importance of the HSC and its significance after you leave school. The mentors taught me to not give up on my dreams and to achieve your goals and AIME high.

-year 11 mentee, new south wales, 2014

AIME is a place where everyone can just relax and be themselves, it’s a place what encourages you to be something, it’s a place that lets you know you’re something, and that as an Indigenous teen you can succeed. AIME has given me a better perspective on education.

-year 11 mentee, new south wales, 2014


UOW was the first program established outside of Sydney and has the largest number of mentees of any program with 595. AIME was established at Wollongong in 2008, expanded to the Shoalhaven and Bega campuses in 2013 and then Bateman’s Bay in 2014. Over 200 university students mentor with AIME and even at a large scale every year group has out performed non-Indigenous students. There were 22 progressions to university, which is the highest this site has ever had.


student progression rates


YEAR 7-8
PROGRESSIONS

104/105

99.0%


YEAR 8-9
PROGRESSIONS

77/77

100%


YEAR 9-10
PROGRESSIONS

150/150

100%


YEAR 10-11
PROGRESSIONS

122/128

94.7%

82.9%

95.3%


YEAR 11-12
PROGRESSIONS

68/74

88.1%

73.1%

91.9%


YEAR 12
ATTAINMENT

58/61

86.5%

58.5%

95.1%

NON-INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

INDIGENOUS
RETENTION RATES

AIME
PROGRESSION RATES

Total Students
Progressed

579

Total number
of students

595


Positive Year 12 Pathways

  • University | 22
  • Employment | 09
  • students we are still supporting into pathways | 18
1 STUDENT REPEATING YEAR 12

FINANCE AND PARTNERING

In 2014, AIME achieved a modest surplus of $350,810 (2013: 31,764) taking the accumulated surplus to $2.36 million.

Revenue increased by 22% to reach $10.72 million over 2013 revenue of $8.77 million. This consisted of financial revenue of $6.69 million and inkind support of $4.03 million. The key areas of revenue growth were university support up by 29.9% to $2.53 million, corporate and philanthropic support up by 23.6% to $2.47 million and inkind support up by 25.8% to $4.03 million. There was a slight decline in federal government funding from $0.90 million to $0.82 million.

Expenditure grew by 18.65% to reach $10,367,900. The growth in expenditure was proportionally less than the growth in mentees from 2789 to 4484 in 2014 (61%).

The cost per mentee was $2312 in 2014, which is an improvement on 2013, when the cost per student was $3133. This is partly through the realisation of an economy of scale and also through the addition of the Year 7 and Year 8 programs, which allow us to maximise mentee numbers at existing schools where the infrastructure and school relationships have already been built.

This maintains AIME’s position as the most cost-effective program of its kind in Australia by a considerable margin.

AIME maintained a diversified funding base (pictured below) in 2014. AIME will further diversify our funding base by introducing a fee to schools. This will be trialled with schools in NSW in 2015. A similar diversified base will continue into 2015.

It is the policy of AIME to achieve modest annual cash surpluses to accumulate a cash reserve to help protect our operations in future economic, political or other changes.

To all our partners who have supported AIME, thank you for walking with us.

If you would like to read our full Directors Report & Declaration click here.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

bronwyn-bancroft

BRONWYN BANCROFT DIRECTOR

Bronwyn is a descendant of the Djanbun clan of the Bundjalung nation.

She works as an artist across many mediums. Over her 30 year career, Bronwyn has participated in more than 200 exhibitions, comprising solo and group shows within Australia and overseas.

Her work is held in Australian collections, such as the National Gallery of Australia, Macquarie University, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Australian Museum and Artbank, as well as in overseas collections including Newark Museum USA, Prime Minister of Turkey, The Kelton Foundation USA, Volkerkunde Museum, Germany and Westpac USA.

Bronwyn currently holds Board positions with: Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME), Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Cooperative, Commonwealth Bank RAP Committee, Fone Free Feb and Copyright Agency.

Bronwyn has a Diploma of Visual Arts and two Masters degrees from the University of Sydney, one in Studio Art and the other in Visual Art. She is currently a Doctoral candidate at The University of Sydney.


ngiare-brown

PROFESSOR NGIARE BROWN DIRECTOR

Ngiare is a proud Yuin nation woman from the south coast of NSW. She is passionate about Indigenous health, child safety, adolescent development, and building the evidence base that demonstrates connection across culture, resilience and wellbeing.

Ngiare was one of the first Aboriginal medical graduates in Australia, completing her medical degree at the University of Newcastle in 1992 and a Masters in Public Health and Tropical Medicine from James Cook University in 2000. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and is currently undertaking doctoral research in Aboriginal child protection at the University of New South Wales.

During her career Ngiare has held a variety of positions in education, mentoring, clinical practice, research and advocacy. She is a founding member and was foundation CEO with the Aboriginal Indigenous Doctors’ Association (AIDA); founding member of the Pacific Region Indigenous Doctors’ Congress (PRIDoC); Associate Professor and Director of the Poche Centre of Indigenous Health at The University of Sydney; Indigenous Health Adviser to the Australian Medical Association; and Manager of Preventative Indigenous Health Programs for World Vision Australia.

In her role of Assistant Director at the Menzies School of Health Research in Darwin, Ngiare developed a program around child health and human rights within the child health division, and is an inaugural member of the AHRC Close the Gap Campaign.

Ngiare has made extensive contributions in research process, bioethics, policy, translation and practice within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and has worked over the past two decades to develop an extensive international network in Indigenous health and research. In 2005 she was named the AMA’s Woman in Medicine for her contributions to the profession.

Ngiare is currently Executive Manager Research and Senior Public Health Medical Officer at the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation where she is making a significant contribution to the research and reform agenda. She also has an academic appointment at the University of Wollongong as Professor of Indigenous Health and Education.


paul-chandler

PROFESSOR PAUL CHANDLER DIRECTOR

Professor Chandler holds an Honours Bachelor of Science degree from The University of Sydney and a Master of Science in Psychology and PhD from the University of New South Wales.

Paul is the recipient of numerous teaching and research awards and is regarded as an international expert in cognition and learning. He is known as an innovative and popular lecturer and a strong advocate for education and social inclusion. Paul has graduated over 45 research students from 20 countries and has attracted over $5 million of competitive research funding.

In 2008, he was awarded as one of Australia’s ten most preeminent researchers and is currently the most cited educational researcher appointed at any Australian university.

Paul completed two terms as Head of School of Education at UNSW prior to being appointed Dean of Education at the University of Wollongong in 2007. A highly respected leader in his community, Paul has a long history of working with Aboriginal communities across Australia for over 30 years.

Paul is currently the Executive Director ‘Early Start’ and was instrumental in the success of the $44 million Early Start Project, which is a worldclass facility concentrating on social inclusion and the early years of life. In addition, he is the Pro Vice Chancellor (Inclusion & Outreach) at the University of Wollongong.


philip-clark

PHILIP CLARK AM DIRECTOR

Philip Clark AM is a member of the J P Morgan Advisory Council. He was Managing Partner and CEO of Minter Ellison and worked with that firm from 1995 until June 2005.

Prior to joining Minter Ellison, Phil was Director and Head of Corporate with ABN Amro Australia and prior to that he was Managing Partner of Mallesons Stephen Jaques for 16 years. Earlier in his career he worked with a Pratt Industries subsidiary and with Shell Australia.

Phil now serves on a number of boards and advisory boards. His appointments include listed and private companies and a number of government boards and advisory boards.

His work in the notfor profit sector is focussed on education outcomes and includes Chairing the University of Wollongong Early Start Advisory Board, Director of High Resolves Foundation and AIME, where he is a Director and Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee.

Phil has Bachelor degrees in Arts and Law from The University of Sydney and an MBA from Columbia University.

He was appointed as a Member in the General Division of the Order of Australia in 2007 for his contribution to the development of national law firms and encouraging corporate involvement in community programs.


geoff-lovell

GEOFF LOVELL DIRECTOR (CHAIR)

Geoff was a founding Director of AIME in 2008 and has been Chairman since 2009.

Geoff has over 20 years of professional experience in banking, funds management, management consulting and engineering. He is currently a Division Director of Macquarie Bank Limited, based in Sydney, where he has worked since 2001. Geoff is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Apart from AIME, Geoff has served in a number of non-executive roles, including as: Chairman of the Investment Committee of the Indigenous Real Estate Investment Trust managed by Indigenous Business Australia (since 2013); Member of the Council of St Paul’s College at The University of Sydney (1995-2013; Chairman 2010-13; Treasurer 2002-09); Member of the Council of Sydney Church of England Grammar School (since 2013); and VicePresident of Sydney University Cricket Club (since 1989).

Geoff has First Class Honours Degrees in Engineering from the University of Sydney and in Politics, Philosophy and Economics (PPE) from the University of Oxford, where he was the inaugural Bradman Scholar (1990-93).

He received Blues for Cricket at both universities and was Captain of the Oxford University Cricket Club in 1992.


michael-mcleod

MICHAEL MCLEOD DIRECTOR

Michael McLeod has been described by a senior Federal politician as “one of Australia’s most valuable sons.”

Michael and his family are part of Australia’s stolen generations, having been removed from his parents, along with his siblings, at the age of two and never reunited as a family. Michael grew up alone in state ward homes and foster homes. Alcohol and drug addition plagued Michael in his twenties and by his early thirties Michael was homeless. A successful rehabilitation program has seen him clean and sober for thirteen years.

Michael was reluctant to depend on government social handouts or welfare, refusing employment benefits and Aboriginal housing benefits. He started his own niche telecommunications business ten years ago and today Message Stick is a growing multimillion dollar business.

Message Stick is a unique business and has shown that Aboriginal Australians can own and manage a services business that engages with large corporations and government agencies, without seeking sponsorships, donations or social grants.

Message Stick is also working closely with the Federal Government, the Chamber and the Business Council of Australia to change government policy approach to Indigenous Australians from a welfare and subsidy-based focus to supporting real economic development, business ownership and entrepreneurship.

Following the establishment and subsequent success of Message Stick, Michael was looking for ways to give back to the community. Initial research into a US model of supplier diversity, lead to the establishment of Supply Nation, which attracted an investment of $3M from the government to pilot Australia’s first ever minority supplier development council and was launched in 2009.


jeff-mcmullen

JEFF MCMULLEN AM DIRECTOR

Journalist, author and filmmaker for five decades, Jeff McMullen AM has been a foreign correspondent for Australian Broadcasting Corporation, reporter for Four Corners and Sixty Minutes, anchor of the 33 part issue series on ABC Television, Difference of Opinion and host of forums on National Indigenous Television.

Recent documentaries have focussed on the human rights of the First Peoples, the impact of the NT Intervention and the chronic illness taking many lives. McMullen’s film, East Coast Encounter, is now travelling Australia as part of an exhibition by leading artists, poets and historians who explore James Cook’s 1770 contact with Aboriginal people and the impact of terra nullius.

As well as serving as a director of AIME and the Engineering Aid Australia Indigenous Summer School program, Jeff worked for fourteen years as Honorary CEO of Ian Thorpe’s Fountain for Youth, establishing early learning and the Literacy Backpack program in 22 remote communities. He was a foundation Trustee of the Jimmy Little Foundation.

Jeff has been prominent in the Close the Gap campaign, chairing forums for NACCHO in New South Wales, Queensland, Western Australia and Victoria. He has worked closely with the Sunrise Health Service in the Katherine Region of the Northern Territory developing maternal and infant health programs.

Jeff is patron of the Merry Maker’s troupe for Down’s Syndrome children and Mirabel, the foundation working to support the extended families caring for children whose parents have died from drug overdose.

Jeff worked with the University of Canberra’s Healthpact Centre developing health promotion and social equality programs for children.

In 2006 Jeff was awarded an Order of Australia (AM), for service to journalism and efforts to raise awareness of economic, social and human rights issues in Australia and overseas, as well as service to charity.


mayrah-sonter

MAYRAH SONTER DIRECTOR

Proud Wiradjuri woman, Mayrah Sonter holds her culture and her early beginnings growing up in inner western Sydney’s Redfern, close to her heart. Mayrah has forged a career path supporting and empowering her people at the grassroots community level and on the national stage.

Mayrah’s latest initiative is 33 Creative with its mantra of ‘Engage, Inspire, Empower’ and takes her passion a step further, as well as complimenting her experience as a Board Director of the Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience, Event Manager for the Deadlys® and her communications specialist roles over 10 years with both private and government organisations.

Mayrah is an accomplished events producer, TV presenter, radio producer and presenter, journalist, public relations and media specialist. She holds a BA in Communications (Public Communications) from the University of Technology, Sydney and was, most recently, the Head of Events at the Deadly Vibe Group, and a Cultural Consultant for the IUCN World Indigenous Parks Congress.

Mayrah’s career motivation aligns with her desire to empower First Nations peoples, through meaningful conversations and helping to bring people together through media, events, breaking down stereotypes and providing opportunities for real connections.

One of Mayrah’s greatest experiences has been producing grassroots community events such as the national Vibe 3on3® and the Vibe Alive festivals and the opportunities this created for working with communities across the country and gaining knowledge of the issues they face and the great work being done on the ground.

Prior to Vibe, Mayrah worked with Emma Collison Publicity and Michelle Guthrie Publicity on a range of community and stage events. In the education sphere, Mayrah has worked at the Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate, on the inaugural Nanga Mai Awards to recognise Aboriginal student achievement and as the Indigenous Student Liaison Officer at the Presbyterian Ladies’ College, Sydney.


tanisha-stanton

TANISHA STANTON DIRECTOR

Tanisha is a descendant of the Kamilaroi people. After spending her early years in Dubbo, Tanisha’s family moved to Newcastle to increase her educational and sporting opportunities.

At 15 years of age Tanisha won Most Promising Sports Talent at the 2011 Deadly Awards and featured on the SBS television program Living Black that same year.

She became a member of the Indigenous Women’s All Stars rugby league team at 18 and played in the Australian Women’s All Stars. Tanisha was then named in the Australian under19 Netball Development Squad after captaining NSW at the national championships in Melbourne.

In early 2014 Tanisha joined AIME as a Program Manager on the Sydney Team, delivering program sessions for mentees and mentors on campus at The University of Sydney.

Later in the year she joined the Australian Rugby Union’s sevens squad, in pursuit of her longterm goal to wear the green and gold at the Olympics. At that time Tanisha was one of only two Aboriginal female players to sign a fulltime, professional contract with the ARU program.

Tanisha was nominated for a Most Popular New Talent Logie award in 2014 for her role hosting NITV’s Barefoot Sunday program, where she covered events such as the Murri Rugby League Carnival in Queensland and the NSW Koori Knockout, as well as previewing the Anthony Mundine v ‘Sugar’ Shane Mosley fight.

Tanisha joined the AIME Board in late 2014 and is delighted to continue her involvement with AIME and have the opportunity to contribute to the organisation through her role as Director.


THANKS TO OUR PARTNERS

Thank you to all the Partners who walked with us in 2014.

NATIONAL PARTNERS

bryan-foundation logo coca-cola-australia-foundation logo commonwealth-bank logo google logo gray-family-foundation logo harvey-norman logo lend-lease logo
origin-foundation logo perpetual logo shell-development-australia logo social-ventures-australia logo target logo third-link logo the-trust-company logo virgin-australia logo wesfarmers-limited logo

UNIVERSITY PARTNERS

anu logo bond university logo cqu-logo curtin-logo ecu-logo federation-uni-logo monash-uni-logo murdoch-logo notre-dame-logo
rmit-uni-logo southern-cross-logo uni-of-canberra-logo uni-of-sa-logo usyd-logo uni-of-sunshine-coast-logo uni-of-wollongong-logo

OTHER KEY PARTNERS

  • ABB GROUP
  • ACCOR ASIA PACIFIC
  • ALLENS OPERATIONS PTY LTD
  • AMP FOUNDATION
  • ARNOLD BLOCH LEIBLER
  • BAIN & COMPANY
  • DEPARTMENT OF PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET (FORMERLY DEEWR)
  • FOXTEL
  • INFINITAS
  • JURLIQUE INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD
  • KESSLER
  • LINKEDIN
  • MJ BALE
  • NEWMONT MINING
  • NEWSCORP
  • SOUTHERLAND DISTRICT TRADE
  • TRANSFIELD FOUNDATION
  • TRANSPORT FOR NSW
  • WESFARMERS RESOURCES LIMITED

IN KIND PARTNERS

  • ATLASSIAN
  • BAKER & MCKENZIE
  • CRICKET NSW
  • HIDDEN DOOR
  • KPMG
  • SONG DIVISION
  • ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE, THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY
  • ST PAULS COLLEGE THE UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY
  • VERTICAL RESPONSE

PHILANTHROPIC PARTNERS

  • ALEXANDRA & LLOYD MARTIN FAMILY FOUNDATION
  • BARTLETT FAMILY FOUNDATION
  • THE DYSON BEQUEST
  • JOHN & MYRIAM WYLIE FOUNDATION
  • THE KIMBERLEY FOUNDATION
  • MADDOCKS FOUNDATION
  • MERIDIAN GLOBAL FOUNDATION
  • PERPETUAL
  • THE SNOW FOUNDATION
  • VONWILLER FOUNDATION
  • THE WYATT BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION INC
  • ZIG INGE GROUP FOUNDATION

GALA BALL PARTNERS

  • BUNNINGS
  • BRONWYN BANCROFT
  • CHANNEL 7
  • FOX SPORTS
  • HARDIE GRANT EGMONT
  • INSURANCE AUSTRALIA GROUP
  • LEOKADIA
  • MERIVALE
  • OPERA AUSTRALIA
  • PICKLES AUCTION
  • SYDNEY THEATRE COMPANY
  • THE BODY SHOP
  • THE HAPPINESS INSTITUTE
  • TRIBAL WARRIOR

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

  • ABORIGINAL HEALTH AND MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
  • ACCOUNTING FOR GOOD
  • CAREERTRACKERS INDIGENOUS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
  • INDIGENOUS BUSINESS AUSTRALIA
  • NATIONAL CENTRE OF INDIGENOUS EXCELLENCE
  • SYDNEY UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL CLUB

There are hundreds of other valued partners that AIME is grateful to work closely with. These partners include schools, local community organisations, land councils, organisations who provide support through payroll giving, matched giving and individuals who provide key strategic advice and opportunities.

Thank you for walking with us


REPORTING DEFINIIONS

DEFINITION OF PARTICIPATION:

AIME defines ‘participation in the program’ as attendance to at least one AIME session.

DEFINITION OF ENGAGEMENT:

Only students who have met minimum attendance requirements will be included in reporting. These students are defined as being ‘engaged’. Reporting requirements are:

  • For Year 7 and Year 8 students, attendance at a minimum of three (3) modules of the Year 7 or Year 8 Program;
  • For Year 9 and Year 10 students, attendance at a minimum of six (6) modules of the Year 9 or Year 10 Program;
  • For Year 11 and Year 12 students, attendance at a minimum of three (3) modules of the Year 11 or Year 12 Program;

OR attendance at a minimum of four (4) AIME Tutor Squad sessions.

DEFINITION OF PROGRESSION:

AIME defines ‘progression’ for AIME mentees in Years 9 to 11 as the successful transition into the next year of schooling within a oneyear period. AIME defines ‘schooling’ as any education provider, approved or registered with the relevant state or territory. This includes:

  • Government and non-government schools;
  • VET education providers; and
  • Home schooling.

DEFINITION OF COMPLETION:

AIME defines ‘completion’ for a Year 12 mentee as satisfying the requirements of Year 12 attainment in the relevant state or territory

DEFINITION OF A SCHOOL LEAVER:

AIME defines a ‘school leaver’ as a student who has completed their current year of schooling (Year 10 or above) and has left school and:

  • Enrolled in a training course at TAFE;
  • Enrolled in a training course with another approved training organisation;
  • Undertaken an apprenticeship or traineeship;
  • Undertaken employment; or
  • Undertaken some combination of education OR training and employment.

DEFINITION OF A STREAM:

AIME defines a ‘stream’ as a cohort of students from a particular year group and region enrolled in the AIME program.

DEFINITION OF A SESSION:

AIME defines a ‘session’ as a day in which one of the AIME delivery modes is run. Within a session, there will be between 1 and 3 AIME modules delivered.

DEFINITION OF MODULE:

AIME defines a ‘module’ as a one-hour course within the AIME Program. There are 49 unique modules that make up the program across Years 7-12.

DEFINITION OF YEAR 12 TO UNIVERSITY:

AIME defines a ‘Year 12 to University’ transition as an AIME student who completed Year 12 and is accepted and enrolled into either an undergraduate degree at university or an accredited university preparation course.

DEFINITION OF YEAR 12 TO FURTHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

AIME defines a ‘Year 12 to Further Education and Training’ transition as an AIME student who has completed Year 12 and is now:

  • Enrolled into the Defence Force;
  • Enrolled in a training course at TAFE;
  • Enrolled in a training course with another approved training organisation;
  • Undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship;
  • Undertaking some combination of education or training and employment.

DEFINITION OF YEAR 12 TO EMPLOYMENT:

AIME defines a ‘Year 12 to Employment’ transition as an AIME student who completed Year 12 and now has confirmed fulltime or parttime employment.

thank you!

THANK YOU


THANK YOU FOR HELPING US FUEL THE FIRE THAT BURNS SO BRIGHTLY INSIDE EVERY ONE OF THESE KIDS

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