AIME

Annual Report 2013

AIME CEO’s Introduction

An Introduction from AIME’s CEO

We are excited to share our 2013 Annual Report with you. Each year, as the program expands, the results get stronger. Before we spoil all the surprises, scroll through this site, take it all in, and enjoy what has made this a great year.

What is AIME?

AIME is a dynamic educational mentoring program that is proven to support Indigenous students through high school and into university, employment or further education and training at the same rate as all Australian students. AIME gives Indigenous students the skills, opportunities, belief and confidence to grow and succeed.

We believe that Indigenous = success.

AIME CEO’s Report 2013

As you will read in the Chairman’s Report, this Annual Report marks the close of another successful year. This is our fifth Annual Report that has proven back-to-back that AIME kids finish school at higher rates than their Indigenous peers and they are marching towards the end of the tunnel with the sign marked ‘Gap Closed’ in their sights.

2013 was our biggest expansion effort to date.

We grew to Western Australia and South Australia, Ballarat and Rockhampton, and were welcomed into these new arenas by visionary university leaders; principals and schools filled with belief; and a wave of mentors, kids and community supporters that were willing to make magic happen.

My message out of 2013 is that whilst we grew, and continued to be successful, we can be much better.

It was tough doubling our staffing numbers, training new people, and growing to really play on a national stage, and the year of growth did have hiccups, but we are stronger and more prepared than ever because of them.

We have shown that the program works, the kids have shown us all that they have potential to be a huge force for this country. AIME mentors have shown that in our university students today there is cause for hope for our leaders of tomorrow.

Because of people like you, reading this report, walking with us and walking with these kids, we have been inspired to raise the bar. So, in this Annual Report, for the first time, you will find details on the transition of our kids beyond those who made it into university.

In the coming years our commitment is to have 100% of AIME kids transitioning through to university, employment or further education and training. Watch this space.

In 2013 we held The Other Election that saw over 600 Indigenous high school students deliver their speeches as the first Indigenous Prime Minister of Australia. With this campaign we were all challenged to imagine what’s possible.

At AIME we are committed to making the seemingly impossible come to life, to imagining new futures. We are committed to being relentlessly positive in our pursuit for a better country for us all. We are committed wholeheartedly in our desire to see a generation of strong, powerful, proud, confident, funny, successful and talented Indigenous people rise up to stand tall once more.

This report shows we are on the right track, but it also shows that we must improve, and we will improve. This report also shows that we have very much arrived on the national stage.

We are a long way from the program I led back in 2005 with 25 university students and 25 Year 9 kids in Redfern. Today we offer our country a story of positivity, hope and a real chance to see the educational gap closed in our lifetime.

We must never forget the hard work done by the people before us, in particular the older generations of Indigenous people who have fought so hard to give us the platform today where we can not only imagine what’s possible, but also bring those imaginings to life.

This report gives us the foundation to embark on a new chapter, and provides the road to engaging 10,000 kids per year with the AIME Program by 2018. Together, this is our chance to deliver one of the biggest practical whacks at closing the gap in Australian history.

If you have walked with us in the past or are walking with us now, puff out your chest, dust off your AIME hoodie and wear it proudly.

Now, we need you more than ever.

Now, we need you to walk with us on the road to 10,000 kids.

Now, we need you to dance to the new beat of Indigenous success.

Many people have worked incredibly hard for many years to give us and these kids this chance; we must seize it.

Keep walking with us.

– Jack Manning Bancroft, CEO
Jack Manning Bancroft

Jack Manning BancroftAIME CEO

AIME Chair’s Report 2013

Last year I wrote that AIME had become a program of national significance and, just 12 months later, this is now firmly established with the AIME Program markedly increasing its breadth, depth and success during 2013.

More than 2,700 Indigenous high school students participated in the AIME Program in 2013, twice the number in 2012. These students were connected with over 1,000 volunteer university student mentors across 23 campuses at 14 universities in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia. They attended 241 high schools, again twice the number in 2012. And in 2014 three new partner universities in the Australian Capital Territory and Western Australia have joined the AIME Program, as well as a new partnership with Virgin Australia for the AIME Brisbane program.

This expanded reach has been enabled by the continued outstanding results of the program, which you will enjoy reading about in this Annual Report. Given the remarkable doubling of the number of participating students in 2013, it is very pleasing that successful outcomes across all measures have been maintained.

For example, of the 220 AIME students who completed Year 12 in 2013 (113 in 2012), 59 transitioned to university (35 in 2012), with an additional 39 students who had previously completed an AIME Program also moving on to university. Many others have embarked on other avenues of further education, training and employment. The Year 9 to Year 12 completion rate in 2013[1] was 76%, well above the national Indigenous average of 38% and close to the national non-Indigenous average of 80%. And once again AIME achieved a remarkable result for the transition from Year 10 to Year 11, historically a ‘drop-out’ point for high school kids, with 550 (93%) of the 590 participating AIME students progressing in 2013, essentially the same rate as for non-Indigenous students.

Such is the growth in national significance and the ongoing success of the program that AIME is now well positioned to facilitate an increasingly mature conversation across Australian society about Indigenous success. This will be a key focus as we seek to reach 10,000 Indigenous kids by 2018.

The strength of AIME’s position to advance this conversation is highlighted by an economic evaluation published by KPMG in December 2013, which found that the AIME Program contributed a net benefit of $38 million to the Australian economy in 2012 and that, for each $1 spent on the AIME Program, $7 in benefits was generated for the Australian economy. KPMG’s report also noted that 232 AIME students in 2012 were reported by their schools as being inducted into positions of leadership, suggesting that positive role modelling by these students would encourage and inspire others to follow.

KPMG’s findings about AIME fit well with the Federal Government’s ‘Closing the Gap’ targets, for which the sixth report was released by the Prime Minister in February 2014. In particular, AIME is already making a strong contribution to achieving the existing target to halve the gap for Indigenous people aged 20-24 in Year 12 or equivalent attainment rates (by 2020). Further, AIME is well placed to contribute to the achievement of the Prime Minister’s proposed new target for closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous school attendance within five years.[2]

Yet the transformative potential of AIME on our nation is personal as much as it is macro-economic. AIME is helping Indigenous kids to believe that Indigenous means success and it is inspiring future generations of Australians to recognise that Indigenous Australia represents an opportunity for all Australians to develop a sense of Australian identity that is connected to the world’s oldest continuous surviving culture.

We are proud that AIME’s national significance was recognised by additional financial support from the Federal Government, with $2.4 million provided in 2013 to expand existing programs at the University of South Australia and Curtin University in Perth. This generous support will see these programs servicing a minimum of 250 Indigenous high school students annually and fund further research into the effectiveness of the AIME Program.

On behalf of the AIME Board, I would like to thank our mentors, our university partners, our high school partners, our corporate and philanthropic partners, the Federal Government and many other generous individuals and groups who made important contributions to AIME in 2013. Our auditors KPMG, whose own generous support is acknowledged, calculated that the monetary value of in-kind support given to AIME in 2013 was an extraordinary $3.2 million.

Special thanks go to AIME’s wonderful staff. It is their hard-earned privilege to come each day to the 26th Best Place to Work in Australia according to BRW Magazine. AIME is the first Indigenous organisation to achieve a top 50 result in this prestigious annual survey, which should see some of Australia’s brightest and most energetic people continue to be attracted to making daily contributions to the education of Indigenous kids via the AIME Program.

As we strive together towards the attainable goal of reaching 10,000 kids by 2018, we are immensely grateful for your support to date and look forward to continuing to walk with you as AIME makes one of the biggest contributions to closing the gap in Australian history.

Thank you, and please join us in the national conversation about Indigenous success!

– Geoff Lovell, Chairman

[1] The factor of Year 9-10 progressions, Year 10-11 progressions, Year 11-12 progressions and Year 12 completions in 2013.

[2] The KPMG report on AIME also supports the report by Deloitte Access Economics, Economic Benefits of closing the gap in Indigenous employment outcomes, released in February 2014, which found that closing the gap would grow Australia’s real GDP by approximately $24 billion per annum, as well as have significant positive implications for government budgets.

Geoff Lovell

Geoff LovellAIME Board Chairman

2013 Highlights

A

AIME grew to engage with more than 2,700 Indigenous high school students who connected with over 1,000 volunteer university student mentors across Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia.

Mentees
2005
25
2006
47
2007
100
2008
300
2009
325
2010
529
2011
787
2012
1,417
2013
2,789
Mentors
2005
25
2006
47
2007
100
2008
300
2009
500
2010
529
2011
787
2012
956
2013
1,066

B

AIME worked with 14 Australian universities across 23 campuses and 241 high schools.

  • Bond UniversityGold Coast
  • Central Queensland UniversityRockhampton
  • Curtin UniversityPerth
  • Edith Cowan UniversityJoondalup
  • Edith Cowan UniversityMt Lawley
  • Federation University AustraliaFormerly University Of Ballarat
  • Monash UniversityBerrick
  • Monash UniversityClayton
  • Monash UniversityPeninsula
  • Murdoch UniversitySouth Street
  • RMIT UniversityBundoora
  • RMIT UniversityMelbourne
  • Southern Cross UniversityCoffs Harbour
  • Southern Cross UniversityGold Coast
  • Southern Cross UniversityLismore
  • University Of QueenslandBrisbane
  • University Of South AustraliaAdelaide
  • University Of South AustraliaMawson Lakes
  • University Of SydneySydney
  • University Of The Sunshine CoastSunshine Coast
  • University Of WollongongBega
  • University Of WollongongShoalhaven
  • University Of WollongongWollongong

C

AIME signed agreements with three new partner universities in the Australian Capital Territory and Western Australia for participation in the AIME Program in 2014. We also signed agreements to expand to new campuses in Gippsland with Federation University Australia and Batemans Bay with the University of Wollongong, and welcomed a new partnership with Virgin Australia for the AIME Brisbane program.

  • Australian National UniversityCanberra
  • Federation University AustraliaFormerly University Of Ballarat
  • University Of CanberraCanberra
  • University Of Notre DameFremantle
  • University Of WollongongBatemans Bay
  • Virgin AustraliaAIME Brisbane

D

In June 2013, AIME received $2.4 Million from the Federal Government Department of Innovation, via the HEPPP Funding stream, to expand existing programs at the University of South Australia in Adelaide and Curtin University in Perth. This funding will see the programs in these regions servicing a minimum of 250 Indigenous high school students annually. Together with the program expansion, $200,000 of this funding will be used for further research with our research partners at the University of Wollongong, into the effectiveness of the AIME Program and the impact of AIME on post-school transitions.

E

The Year 12 program has been expanded to include additional transition support. Program Managers work with Year 12 students one-on-one to assist with their transition to further tertiary studies, traineeships, apprenticeships or employment. This individual support commences in October and follows through to March in the following year. The process allows AIME to provide an additional safety net to help AIME mentees transition to successful post-school opportunities.


F

There were 54 Tutor Squads in operation providing additional homework and tutoring support for AIME mentees as well as other students from our partner high schools in Years 7-12.

G

178 AIME mentees were elected to leadership positions in their schools, including:

  • 14 School Captains
  • 24 Sports Captains
  • 15 Vice Captains
  • 14 Prefects
  • 8 Indigenous Student Leaders
  • 2 Boarding House Captains
  • 38 students elected to their Students’ Representative Council

H

Teachers reported more than 330 stories of success from their students involved in the AIME Program, including:

  • Full scholarships to university
  • Academic awards
  • Sporting achievements (e.g. representation at the state and national level)
  • School traineeships
  • Awards for outstanding community service
  • Outstanding achievements in the Arts (e.g. film, television, dance & theatre)
  • Public speaking awards

I

Some of Australia’s most inspiring people such as Lowitja O’Donoghue and Adam Goodes attended AIME ‘Window to Fame’ sessions to share their stories with the students. All of these guests volunteered their time and some, such as Jeremy Marou, (from the successful music duo “Busby Marou”) went to extraordinary lengths including paying for their own flights and accommodation, just to be able to speak with students. We are humbled by this level of commitment and energised that this leadership will help to inspire a stronger generation of Australians.

J

98 Year 12 graduates transitioned into university commencing their studies in 2014. This included 59 current AIME students and an additional 39 students who participated in the Year 12 program in 2013 or had previously completed an AIME Program in their schooling journey.

K

Recruitment for new staff members was completed with 13 new contracts signed, which sees the AIME Team grow to 64 full-time staff in 2014 Learning and Development for AIME staff was re-structured with the launch of the AIME Institute. The AIME Institute comprises 14 days across the year where staff come together each quarter to reflect, plan and take part in a series of learning and development sessions. At the AIME Institute, staff attend workshops run by some of Australia’s leading organisations including Google, Lend Lease and Hidden Door as well as prominent Indigenous and non-Indigenous leaders.


L

NHD 2013 Hoodie

AIME held its fourth National Hoodie Day, raising nearly $100,000 to support more Indigenous kids to finish school at the same rate as every Australian child and bring us closer to working with 10,000 Indigenous kids across Australia by 2018.

The iconic tree that features on the front of the AIME hoodie was designed by Alicia Johnson, a former AIME mentee who is now in her final year of studies at the University of Sydney, where she is also an AIME mentor and Casual National Presenter for AIME. Alicia was the first Indigenous Captain of her school and the first member of her family to attend university. The sleeves of the Hoodie feature artwork from award-winning Australian Indigenous artist, Bronwyn Bancroft. AIME proudly partnered with iconic Australian brand, BONDS, to bring you the 2013 AIME Hoodie along with FOXTEL who kindly produced a television commercial promoting the campaign.

M

The Other Election Logo

AIME launched The Other Election to showcase 646 Indigenous students in Years 10-12 delivering what would be their inaugural speech as Australia’s first Indigenous Prime Minister.

Three finalists, Danae Haynes, Shannon Hart-Cole and Jayden Gerrand, delivered their speeches in Canberra, where they met with the Prime Minister of Australia, The Honourable Tony Abbott, the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator The Honourable Nigel Scullion, and Her Excellency the Honourable Quentin Bryce AC CVO, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia at Government House.

With the support of our principal media partner, FOXTEL, and the backing of Channel V, Eardrum, Fox Sports, News Corporation, NITV, Sky News A-PAC and Southern Cross Austereo, hundreds of Indigenous kids and nearly 70,000 online voters dreamed to imagine what’s possible.

You can view the speeches at www.theotherelection.com.au

N

Strut the Streets Logo

500 swimwear-clad strutters took to Martin Place in Sydney for the fifth annual AIME Strut the Streets. Participants were treated to performances by Daryl Braithwaite; Australia’s Got Talent runner-up, Dean Brady; Triple J Unearthed National Indigenous Music Award (NIMA) artist and AIME Program Manager, Robbie Miller, and Aussie acts Shantan Wantan Ichiban and The Faders. With the support of the NSW Waratahs and Channel V’s Danny Clayton, the event raised over $100,000 to support AIME’s 2018 expansion.

O

Download the Hip Hop Track

The inaugural AIME’s Got Talent kicked off, with headlining performances by five AIME mentees: Brayden Costanzo (NSW), Kristal-Anne Rogers (WA), Matty Ladiges (VIC), Shailyn Isaac (WA) and Zack Lane (NSW). As winners of the Year 9 AIME Hip Hop competition, the kids were given a challenge: in four hours, they had to record a music track that they would perform at the very first AIME’s Got Talent event that night and again in front of 500 people in the Sydney CBD for Strut the Streets the next day.

Special thanks to the guys and gals who guided the kids through the songwriting and recording, and helped make the magic happen: Chance Waters, Danny Clayton, Mind Over Matter, Nooky, Phil Jamieson, Prinnie Stevens and Song Division.


P

AIME’s social media presence expanded, growing from 20,763 friends on Facebook on 1 January 2013 to 40,164 friends on 1 January 2014.

In the same period, we grew our Twitter followers from 2,076 to 3,209, and expanded our presence on LinkedIn, Instagram and YouTube.

Q

Virgin CEO, Sir Richard Branson, talked about the power of mentoring in front of mentors, mentees and community members at the University of South Australia alongside AIME CEO Jack Manning Bancroft and University of South Australia Vice Chancellor, Professor David Lloyd.

R

An independent economic evaluation conducted by KPMG found that AIME contributed $38 million to the Australian economy in 2012. The report found that for each $1 spent on the program, $7 in benefits was generated for the economy.

The report was run exclusively in The Australian on 1 March, featuring stories from two AIME mentees, Corey Belsito and Shakiah Tungai.

Since completing AIME at Warilla High School last year, Corey’s enrolled in a civil engineering degree at UOW: University of Wollongong. And to cap it off, he’s signed up to be an AIME mentor this year. “I just wanted to give back what the mentors gave me and hopefully inspire Indigenous students to achieve the best in any field.”

Shakiah’s in Year 12 at Warilla, and is weighing up going to uni. “When I first walked onto the University of Wollongong campus, it felt so cool, it felt awesome. I reckon that AIME has made me want to go uni more. I’d like to go for the experience; to meet new friends; see what it’s like in the big lecture rooms.”

S

AIME released the results of its first external evaluation conducted in partnership with the University of Wollongong and the University of Western Sydney. The qualitative and quantitative findings of this research were overwhelmingly positive and indicate that the AIME Program ‘is effective in strengthening and solidifying the mentees’ aspirations, sense of engagement, and sense of identity’ as well as improving actual Year 12 retention.

View the Report

T

Jack Manning Bancroft, our CEO, was awarded the Dyson scholarship given to one Australian nonprofit leader to attend the executive program at the Stanford Business School in San Francisco throughout June and July. This six-week program featured a general management curriculum customised to the needs of senior executives working in global companies, government agencies, and nonprofit organisations. This scholarship provided Jack with the opportunity to develop further professionally and increase the awareness and network of AIME in a global arena.

U

AIME was named by Business Review Weekly as Australia’s 26th Best Place to Work. AIME is the first Indigenous organisation to ever achieve a top 50 result.

BRW’s Best Places to Work Logo

The Other Election

The Other Election kids with Tony Abbott

Over the past four years, AIME has run a special session where our kids write and deliver a speech as the first Indigenous Prime Minister of Australia. As we watched this magic unfold across the country, and the kids stepped up to share their vision of a future we could all be proud of, we felt compelled to share it with the nation.

So in 2013, we gave the kids a chance. It was a chance to dream big. A chance to shoot for the highest office in the land. A chance to offer their vision for the nation.

They took that chance, and ran with it. And with their dreams, The Other Election was born.

As the federal election was heating up in Canberra, hundreds of Indigenous kids across the country were also preparing for an election. Launching in August, The Other Election saw 646 Indigenous kids in Years 9 to 12 offer their vision for Australia as our first Indigenous Prime Minister. These kids wrote, rehearsed and recorded their speeches in just two hours. Given a lifetime, imagine what’s possible…

Over 70,000 votes were cast. Each vote was a voice. A voice that says there is cause for hope. A voice that says we can see an Indigenous Prime Minister in our lifetime. A voice that believes in these kids.

We saw kids do things they’d never done before. We saw kids speak publicly for the first time. These political candidates weren’t slick. They hadn’t been polished by spin doctors. They were raw, honest, challenging. They spoke from the heart. And they told us that in Australia in 2013, we shouldn’t just be imagining the election of an Indigenous Prime Minister in their lifetimes.

It will be a reality.

We saw kids like Kieren Jarrett. Kieren was in Year 12 at Nambucca High School on the NSW mid north coast. Before The Other Election, he’d never done public speaking. Ever.

But when Kieren delivered a speech filled with hope, positivity and greatness, he captured the imagination of his Coffs Harbour community. Kieren was asked to deliver his speech at his school NAIDOC assembly. Afterwards, the local Elders told Kieren that he was now among them as a leader in his community. That’s pretty special. Watch Kieren’s speech.

We saw kids like Kalinda Palmer. Kalinda is from Broome, and was a Year 10 student boarding at Ballarat Grammar School in Victoria. After missing the Prime Minister session at AIME and wanting so badly to submit her speech, Kalinda wrote and recorded her own in her dorm room after school. Watch Kalinda’s speech.

We saw a bunch of high profile Aussies cast their vote, including musicians Missy Higgins and Jessica Mauboy, Sky News anchors Stan Grant and Paul Murray, Triple J presenter Tom Tilley and DJ Nina Las Vegas, Daily Telegraph columnists Joe Hildebrand and Sarrah Le Marquand, Channel V host James Kerley, television and radio presenter Osher Gunsberg, Olympic champion Ian Thorpe, Socceroo Tim Cahill, Origin hero Mark Gasnier, musicians Aloe Blacc and his wife Maya Jupiter, musician and actor Axle Whitehead, Max TV MUSIC presenter and radio DJ Jane Gazzo, Bloc Party front man Kele Okereke, and Aussie hip hop crews the Hilltop Hoods and Horrorshow throwing their support behind the kids. Radio host Merrick Watts even created his own AIME fundraiser, challenging Southern Cross Austereo staff to kick an AFL ball into a bucket to win a prize.

And we saw some new branches of the AIME story come to life. Our CEO Jack penned an opinion piece in the Herald Sun (read online) and Channel 10’s The Project covered the whole shazam. Check it out below!

The Other Election on The Project

Our friends at FOXTEL created an ad for The Other Election, which aired across their channels throughout August and September. Jack was also interviewed on the Channel 7 Morning Show and Triple J Hack. Matty Johns, Greg Inglis and Gorden Tallis donned hoodies for Fox Sports’ Monday Night with Matty Johns and ads were aired across Southern Cross Austereo with the support of hosts Kyle Sandilands, Jackie O, Merrick Watts, Julian Schiller, Rachel Corbett, Fifi Box, Jules Lund, Matthew Johns, Mark Geyer, Gus Worland and Chris Page. We also saw articles in the Koori Mail and National Indigenous Times, and over two hundred regional news stories about local candidates.

By 18 September, we had our top 10. These ten finalists headed to Sydney for two days of intensive campaign workshops. They were mentored by some of the country’s best speech writers, celebrities and business people, including Channel V host Billy Russell, Sky News anchor Stan Grant, News Corp Head of Corporate Affairs Stephen Browning, hip hop MC Urthboy, NITV News anchor Natalie Ahmat, Generation One Development Director and Spokesperson Jeremy Donovan, Olympic sprinter Matt Shirvington, Tribal Warrior CEO Shane Phillips, The Australian reporter Rick Morton, RECOGNISE Campaign Director Tim Gartrell and RECOGNISE This Campaign Coordinator Peter Dawson, and one of the crucial people who got AIME off the ground in the early days and then became one of AIME’s very first Program Managers, Paul Sinclair.

Our finalists also spoke with the NSW Deputy Premier, the Honourable Andrew Stoner, and the NSW Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, the Honourable Victor Dominello.

On day two, they put the finishing touches on their inaugural speeches and headed to FOXTEL studios to film their speeches in professional recording studios.

Fast forward to December, and some pretty big things were going down in the nation’s capital.

Our three finalists in The Other Election, Danae Haynes, Jayden Gerrand and Shannon Hart-Cole, were flown to Canberra to deliver the speeches they wrote as the first Indigenous Prime Minister of Australia. There they met with the Prime Minister of Australia, The Honourable Tony Abbott.

These kids knocked it out of the park. They delivered their speeches to a Senate Committee Room packed with journalists, camera crews, politicians and the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator The Honourable Nigel Scullion.

Danae, Jayden and Shannon smashed back-to-back interviews with the press, toured Parliament House and the War Memorial, heard the squabbles of Question Time, and when all was said and done, they headed to Government House to perform their speech one last time for Her Excellency The Honourable Quentin Bryce AC CVO Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

And as Danae, Jayden and Shannon headed for home, there was more good news from the ACT: the Australian National University and the University of Canberra would be joining AIME in 2014.

A sincere thanks to our principal media partner, FOXTEL, without whom this would not have been possible. We also thank our friends at Channel V, Eardrum, Fox Sports, News Corporation, NITV, Sky News A-PAC and Southern Cross Austereo, who banded together to see hundreds of Indigenous kids offer their vision and imagine what’s possible.

Watch the speeches at theotherelection.com.au.

Thank you for imagining what’s possible.

National Report

In 2013, AIME continued to work with schools and universities in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria and expanded to South Australia and Western Australia. This program expansion enabled 2,789 students from Years 7-12 the opportunity to participate in AIME, a 96.8% increase on the number reached in 2012 (1,417 students). This reflects all of the students who attended either a session at a university campus or a Tutor Squad.


Reporting Rules

The reporting rules below explain how AIME calculated grade progression and completion rates for 2013:

1

AIME did not measure Year 7 and Year 8 completion rates as in 2013 there was no structured program for these years; the structured program began in Year 9.

2

AIME has a minimum attendance requirement that needs to be achieved before we track student progression. This is attendance at:

  • A minimum of 50% of the Year 9 or Year 10 Core program
  • A minimum of 50% of the Year 9 or 10 Outreach Days
  • A minimum of 50% of the Year 11 Leadership and Development Days
  • A minimum of 50% of the Year 12 Leadership and Development Days for students who have not completed prior years at AIME
  • Participation in the Year 12 Leadership and Development Days for students who have completed at least one previous year at AIME
  • And/or at least four AIME Tutor Squad sessions

3

The AIME sites included in reporting for 2013 are:

  • Bond University
  • Central Queensland University
  • Curtin University
  • Edith Cowan University – Joondalup
  • Edith Cowan University – Mt Lawley
  • Federation University Australia (formerly University of Ballarat)
  • Monash University – Berrick
  • Monash University – Clayton
  • Monash University – Peninsula
  • Murdoch University – South Street
  • University of Queensland
  • RMIT University – Bundoora
  • RMIT University – Melbourne
  • Southern Cross University – Coffs Harbour
  • Southern Cross University – Gold Coast
  • Southern Cross University – Lismore
  • University of South Australia – Adelaide
  • University of South Australia – Mawson Lakes
  • University of Sydney
  • University of the Sunshine Coast
  • University of Wollongong – Bega
  • University of Wollongong – Shoalhaven
  • University of Wollongong – Wollongong

Progression & Completion Stats

Of the 2,789 students who attended AIME, 1,910 students completed AIME as per our data requirements stated above.

Following are the national progression and completion results for the AIME 2013 program for our 1,910 students who met the reporting requirements.

Year 9-10 Progression: 97.6%

694 students in the Year 9 program | 677 progressed to Year 10

Year 10-11 Progression: 93.2%

590 students in the Year 10 program | 550 progressed to Year 11

Year 11-12 Progression: 89.7%

390 students in the Year 11 program | 350 progressed to Year 12

Year 12 Completion: 93.2%

236 students in the Year 12 program | 220 completed Year 12

Year 12-University Progression: 26.8%

220 AIME students completed Year 12 | 59 progressed into university*

* This number only reflects students enrolled in university in 2014 who met our reporting requirements.

There were an additional 39 Year 12 students who progressed into university, that did not meet our reporting requirements. These students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 or attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore did not meet our reporting requirements. There were also an additional 5 students who are embarking on a gap year before planning to study at university in 2015. These 5 students have also not been included as progressing to university.


Post-School Transition

In 2013 we had our biggest cohort of Year 12 students to date and for the first time, tried to capture their post-school transitions. We are delighted that the largest cohort of our Year 12 students transitioned to university and many more have progressed onto other avenues of further education, training and employment.

This cohort of successful Indigenous students are embarking on a diverse range of transitions from architecture, nursing and engineering at university, to representation on elite sporting teams, to careers in the creative arts industries and many more exciting options. The following table outlines 191 of the post-school transitions we were able to confirm for our Year 12 cohort.[1]

University: 5930.9%
TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO): 4020.9%
Employment: 3920.4%
Seeking Employment: 189.4%
Apprenticeship: 157.8%
Other: 63.1%
Elite Sports Pathway: 52.6%
Deferred University / Gap Year: 52.6%
Defence Force: 42.1%

[1] 220 AIME students completed Year 12, however we were only able to confirm 191 post-school transitions at the time of this report.

National Outcomes

The table below compares the national school progression and completion rates, as well as university admission rates, for non-Indigenous students, Indigenous students and AIME students in 2013.

This data confirms that AIME has had another consecutive year of school progression and completion results that are significantly higher than the national Indigenous statistics. The AIME Program results are in accordance with an independent examination conducted by AIME’s auditors, KPMG.

This data is made more significant by the fact that 77% of our students attend schools that are below average (1000) according to the Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) value system. The average weighted (ICSEA) data of AIME students in 2013 was 966.8. Some typical AIME schools, with an ICSEA values similar to this are:

  • Ingleburn High School, NSW (963)
  • Shailer Park State High School, QLD (963)
  • South Fremantle Senior High School, WA, (967)
  • Salisbury East High School, SA (957)
  • Koo Wee Rup Secondary College, VIC (962)

2013 National Outcomes
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME 2013
Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
97.6%
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
93.2%
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
89.7%
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
93.2%
Year 12-University Progressions
46.0%*
10.0%*
26.8%
Year 9-12 Completions
81.2%
41.4%
76.0%
Year 9-University Progressions
37.4%
4.1%
20.4%

* Refers to the percentage of students who attained an ATAR score that would gain them university entrance.

Sources: ABS, Cat. No. 4221.0, Schools, Australia, 2013 and National Report to Parliament on Indigenous Education and Training, 2008 DEEWR.

It should be noted that AIME data is based on actual progressions while the national data is based on apparent progressions. The apparent progression data is inflated as some states reported apparent progression rates in excess of 100%. The ABS state that they do not undertake an analysis on the status of every student. AIME does analyse the progression and Year 12 completion status of every student in our program providing actual measurements. For more information please see ABS, Cat. No. 4221.0, Schools, Australia, Explanatory notes.

Actual Year 12 completion data has also been difficult to locate. Available comparison data gives the Year 12 attainment rates of 20-24 year olds. We measure Year 12 completions as students who began and finished Year 12 in the same year.


AIME National Outcomes
AIME 2009 Students
AIME 2010 Students
AIME 2011 Students
AIME 2012 Students
AIME 2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
88.0%
88.0%
97.0%
98.6%
97.6%
Year 10-11 Progressions
81.0%
87.0%
92.6%
93.6%
93.2%
Year 11-12 Progressions
92.0%
86.0%
79.0%
84.7%
89.7%
Year 12 Completions
73.0%
100%
87.5%
91.1%
93.2%
Year 12-University Progressions
38.0%
38.0%
35.7%
31.0%
26.8%
Year 9-12 Completions
48.0%
65.8%
62.7%
71.2%
76.0%
Year 9-University Progressions
18.0%
25.1%
22.7%
22.1%
20.4%

Program Outcomes

As well as providing the AIME outcomes for the entire program, the following tables provide outcomes at each site.


Year 9 Program
Student
Progression
Percentage
Progressed
Bond University and Southern Cross University, Gold Coast
46 / 46
100%
Central Queensland University
8 / 8
100%
Curtin University
65 / 71
91.5%
Edith Cowan University
37 / 37
100%
Federation University Australia
7 / 7
100%
Monash University
31 / 34
91.2%
Murdoch University
55 / 58
94.8%
RMIT University
22 / 23
95.7%
Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour
26 / 26
100%
Southern Cross University, Lismore
38 / 38
100%
University of Queensland
37 / 37
100%
University of South Australia
58 / 60
96.7%
University of Sydney
107 / 108
99.1%
University of the Sunshine Coast
30 / 30
100%
University of Wollongong
110 / 111
99.1%
Total
677 / 694
97.6%

Year 10 Program
Student
Progression
Percentage
Progressed
Bond University and Southern Cross University, Gold Coast
38 / 42
90.5%
Central Queensland University
10 / 12
83.3%
Curtin University
55 / 63
87.3%
Edith Cowan University
33 / 33
100%
Federation University Australia
10 / 11
90.9%
Monash University
22 / 23
95.7%
Murdoch University
20 / 22
90.9%
RMIT University
16 / 20
80.0%
Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour
37 / 39
94.9%
Southern Cross University, Lismore
39 / 40
97.5%
University of Queensland
46 / 48
95.8%
University of South Australia
20 / 20
100%
University of Sydney
100 / 105
95.2%
University of the Sunshine Coast
37 / 40
92.5%
University of Wollongong
67 / 72
93.1%
Total
550 / 590
93.2%

Year 11 Program
Student
Progression
Percentage
Progressed
Bond University and Southern Cross University, Gold Coast
24 / 27
88.9%
Central Queensland University
20 / 21
95.2%
Curtin University
28 / 32
87.5%
Edith Cowan University
16 / 16
100%
Federation University Australia
3 / 3
100%
Monash University
13 / 17
76.5%
Murdoch University
16 / 17
94.1%
RMIT University
22 / 25
88.0%
Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour
13 / 13
100%
Southern Cross University, Lismore
20 / 23
87.0%
University of Queensland
28 / 29
96.6%
University of South Australia
17 / 20
85.0%
University of Sydney
52 / 58
89.7%
University of the Sunshine Coast
18 / 21
85.7%
University of Wollongong
60 / 68
88.2%
Total
350 / 390
89.7%

Year 12 Program
Student
Progression
Percentage
Progressed
Bond University and Southern Cross University, Gold Coast
13 / 15
86.7%
Central Queensland University
11 / 11
100%
Curtin University
23 / 24
95.8%
Edith Cowan University
7 / 8
87.5%
Federation University Australia
2 / 2
100%
Monash University
8 / 8
100%
Murdoch University
8 / 9
88.9%
RMIT University
9 / 11
81.8%
Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour
13 / 13
100%
Southern Cross University, Lismore
17 / 17
100%
University of Queensland
23 / 25
92.0%
University of South Australia
5 / 5
100%
University of Sydney
33 / 37
89.2%
University of the Sunshine Coast
18 / 18
100%
University of Wollongong
30 / 33
90.9%
Total
220 / 236
93.2%

Site Outcomes


Bond University / Southern Cross University (Gold Coast)
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME Bond/SCU (GC)
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (46/46)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
90.5% (38/42)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
88.9% (24/27)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
86.7% (13/15)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 11
  • Defence Force 2
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 2
  • Elite Sports Pathway 1
  • Employment 1
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 2

* 4 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and a further 2 attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“AIME was really good as it showed me career options and helped us decide what we want to do in life.”

– Kalinda, Year 9 mentee, Helensvale State High School.

“AIME re-established a principle of selfless contribution for the benefit of the broader community. The program highlighted the importance of recognising that individuals and groups often face different adversities in their lives and that support and encouragement is necessary to ensure they are aware they possess the ability to overcome them.”

– Lana, mentor at Bond University, studying Bachelor of Laws.

“AIME has enhanced my university experience as I do not participate in many aspects of university life, so mentoring with AIME gave me a network of friends at university and made me feel like part of the good work the uni is doing.”

– Jessica, mentor at Bond University, studying Journalism.

“Students have connected with each other through the program and are more supportive of each other as a result. We have our first Indigenous prefect in 2014.”

– Principal, Helensvale State High School.

Central Queensland University
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME CQU
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (8/8)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
83.3% (10/12)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
95.2% (20/21)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
100% (11/11)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 3
  • Employment 2
  • Apprenticeship 1
  • Seeking Employment 1
  • Volunteering 1
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 3

“The mentors have taught me not to be ashamed of myself and to never give up, even if people have given up on me.”

– Jacinta, Year 11 mentee, North Rockhampton High School.

“Since coming to AIME, I have gotten better at participating in things, I’m more confident and I have learnt new skills.”

– Jenaya, Year 12 mentee, North Rockhampton High School.

“AIME has enhanced my university experience as it gave me an opportunity to work with an age group that I need to understand better as a future teacher.”

– Christine, mentor at Central Queensland University.

Curtin University
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME Curtin
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
91.5% (65/71)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
87.3% (55/63)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
87.5% (28/32)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
95.8% (23/24)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 3
  • Apprenticeship 5
  • Seeking Employment 3
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 3
  • Employment 2
  • Deferred University and taking a Gap Year 1
  • Elite Sports Pathway 1
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 6

* 1 of these students attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore is not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“Since coming to AIME I have got better at being respectful to other students, and having self respect and standing up to racism. AIME has also taught me to have no shame and that you can fulfil your dreams if you work hard.”

– Joshua, Year 10 mentee, Darling Ranges Sports College.

“The mentors have taught me a lot. They have taught me how to be a leader and how to achieve my goals. AIME has helped me at school, I have more confidence in work and speaking up.”

– Jennifer, Year 9 mentee, Kent Street Senior High School.

“The AIME Program has been a wonderful addition to our school program. It has provided a wonderful focus in our attempts to support and encourage our Aboriginal students in their learning and their growth as positive contributors to the school and wider community. We are extremely pleased to have been a part of the program and look forward to continuing our relationship into the future.”

– John Eaton, Teacher, Belmont City College.

“I really enjoyed connecting with the mentees, when they told you experiences of their life and were genuinely interested in coming to university. Empowering the mentees to believe in themselves was by far the most special experience. This confirms to me that this program is making a palpable difference with these kids.”

– Lauren, mentor at Curtin University, studying BSc (Exercise, Sport Science and Rehabilitation).

“I used to be unsure how to respond to casual racism heard in public, but now I’m more confident about politely telling someone that I’ve had great experiences with Aboriginal people and I appreciate them not speaking about them disrespectfully.”

– Diana, mentor at Curtin University, studying a Bachelor of Health Sciences.

Edith Cowan University
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME ECU
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (37/37)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
100% (33/33)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
100% (16/16)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
87.5% (7/8)

NOTE: 3 of these students identified as also participating in the Follow the Dream program (1 in Year 11, 2 in Year 9).

Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 1
  • Apprenticeship 3
  • Elite Sports Pathway 1
  • Employment 1
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 1
  • Volunteering 1

* This student attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore is not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“The mentors have taught me to give it everything you got and what I’ve learnt at AIME is to follow your dream and achieve your goals.”

– Tyler, Year 10 mentee, La Salle College.

“Through AIME my confidence has definitely built up and I have improved speaking in front of people. I learnt to get up and have a go at new things even if it is scary.”

– Mikayla, Year 11 mentee, Ocean Reef Senior High School.

“AIME has influenced the way I connect and serve the wider community by allowing me to present an informed knowledge of another culture, as well as watching people within the community grow.”

– Veronica, mentor at Edith Cowan University, studying English Education.

“AIME provided a positive and supportive environment, which added an extra ring of encouragement.”

– Principal, Ocean Reef Senior High School.

Federation University Australia
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME FedUni
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (7/7)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
90.9% (10/11)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
100% (3/3)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
100% (2/2)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • Employment 2

“I honestly wouldn’t ask for anything better. AIME is amazing.”

– Tamika, Year 9 mentee, Ballarat Secondary College.

“Thank you so much for the experience, I loved it and have learnt so much.”

– Troy, Year 9 mentee, Phoenix P-12 College.

“The mentors have taught me to be yourself, stand up and speak, be proud of yourself and your culture.”

– Ebony, Year 10 mentee Phoenix P-12 College.

“I enjoyed learning about a different culture that is such a part of the history of where I live and I enjoyed learning about new and different people.”

– Safiye, mentor at Federation University Australia, studying a Bachelor of Arts (Music Theatre).

“The mentees have taught me to open my eyes to the wider community, they have taught me more about diversity and have given me first-hand experience in mentoring and working with students from the Indigenous background and community.”

– Sarah, mentor at Federation University Australia, studying a Bachelor of Education (Physical Education).

“The impact of AIME was huge!! It allowed the remote community and local Indigenous students at Grammar to get to know each other. All were able to make connections with students from other schools. The program also increased their confidence.”

– Principal, Ballarat Grammar School.

Monash University
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME Monash
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
91.2% (31/34)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
95.7% (22/23)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
76.5% (13/17)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
100% (8/8)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 6
  • Employment 2
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 3

* 1 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and a further 2 attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“Since coming to AIME I have gotten better at saying thank you to the teacher. The mentors have taught me that you can have fun when you learn and do whatever you want to do.”

– Hubba, Year 10 mentee, Elisabeth Murdoch College.

“Thank you for all of your support, advice and never giving up on us, always being understanding and helping in any way you guys can.”

– Naomi, Year 11 mentee, Monterey Secondary College.

“The mentors have taught me that no matter where you go, there are people like you and never be ashamed of who you are and where you come from.”

– Catherine, Year 9 mentee, Cranbourne Secondary College.

“I have been fortunate enough to be a part of the program for 2 years and have continued to learn in several areas over the time, particularly in leadership, but also increased knowledge about Indigenous culture. University can often be an overwhelming and isolating place. I have found that participating in programs such as AIME has helped break up my studies by enabling me to participate in a passion of mine, while taking some of the experience and knowledge gained and using these in my studies.”

– Nick, mentor at Monash University, studying a Bachelor of Arts.

“AIME has enhanced my university experience as it has motivated me to put my head down and achieve my goals. During the first lesson, we all made goals and the AIME Program made me so proud of my mentee for keeping his goals and just as proud of myself for achieving mine as well.”

– Hannah, mentor at Monash University, studying a Bachelor of Arts.

Murdoch University
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME Murdoch
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
94.8% (55/58)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
90.9% (20/22)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
94.1% (16/17)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
88.9% (8/9)

NOTE: 7 of these students identified as also participating in the Follow the Dream program (4 in Year 12, 2 in Year 10, 1 in Year 9).

Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 4
  • Employment 2
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 3

* 1 of these students attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore is not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“The mentors have taught me that anything is possible and to strive for my best.”

– Shannon, Year 11 mentee, Warnbro Community High School.

“Thanks AIME. You guys have made me realise that education is important and not to give up.”

– Mikayla, Year 9 mentee, Warnbro Community High School.

“Thanks for teaching me so many lessons that will help me in life. You have taught me to be proud of myself and everything I do and to make something of myself.”

– Kyara, Year 10 mentee, Hamilton Senior High School.

“I enjoyed learning about really important human qualities such as compassion, empathy, respect. I guess I’ve always tried to incorporate these things in how I live my life but it was great seeing the way AIME structured and presented these topics to the kids.”

– Jessica, mentor at Murdoch University, studying BSc Veterinary Medicine & Surgery.

“When I came to Murdoch, I knew I wanted to contribute to the community there but I had no idea how I would go about doing that. AIME offered me an opportunity to get into the local community, meet a lot of people outside my faculty/the exchange program and even offered me a positive note on my transcript. AIME was a great experience and something I would’ve continued to do if I had extended my exchange.”

– Alysha, mentor and International student at Murdoch University, studying Psychology.

RMIT University
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME RMIT
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
95.7% (22/23)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
80.0% (16/20)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
88.0% (22/25)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
81.8% (9/11)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 4
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 5
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 2

* 2 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“The best thing I did at an AIME session was presenting my future on a piece of paper and knowing that I have a lot to look forward to.”

– Nakia, Year 10 mentee, Santa Maria College.

“I really enjoyed getting to know how people have gotten to where they are and understanding that anything can be possible if you really want it.”

– Samantha, Year 12 mentee, Laverton College.

“The value of mentoring is much greater than I ever imagined and I’m really grateful that I had the chance to experience being a mentor. I now want to become much more involved with the youth in my community as AIME has demonstrated just how far kids can go when someone is there to support them and their achievements. After I graduate, I would also like to spend some time working with Indigenous youth in other parts of Australia.”

– Emily, mentor at RMIT University, studying International Studies.

“The mentees have taught me a lot, and to summarise it all, I think they taught me that nothing is impossible, even when things in life are difficult. Through volunteering with AIME, my university experience has improved. I believe that through having programs like this brings like-minded people together.”

– Mikaela, mentor at RMIT University, studying International Studies.

Southern Cross University (Coffs Harbour)
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME SCU (Coffs)
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (26/26)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
94.9% (37/39)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
100% (13/13)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
100% (13/13)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 8
  • Seeking Employment 3
  • Employment 2
  • Elite Sports Pathway 1
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 1
  • Other 1

* 2 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and a further 1 attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“The things I enjoyed most about AIME were getting to meet and interact with the kids and seeing what a positive change we could make as mentors. Seeing the Year 12 kids graduate their HSC, and seeing the kids doing so well in their speeches was really uplifting. Throughout the program, the mentees really taught me to have confidence in myself! I watched the mentees give it a go despite some of their hesitation, and it really paid off. They grew and thrived within the program.”

– Amie, mentor at Southern Cross University Coffs Harbour, studying a Bachelor of Psychological Science.

“The kids have taught me not to judge a book by its cover as you never know what a person is capable of if they are given an opportunity.”

– Peter, mentor at Southern Cross University Coffs Harbour, studying a Bachelor of Nursing.

“AIME has taught me to never give up and to not be ashamed. Thanks for everything. You guys definitely made my school years a whole lot better.”

– Karly, Year 12 mentee, Orara High School.

“Thank you so much for helping me with my self-esteem. I now have more confidence and have learnt to always do my best and try hard.”

– Jennifer, Year 9 mentee, South Grafton High School.

Southern Cross University (Lismore)
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME SCU (Lismore)
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (38/38)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
97.5% (39/40)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
87.0% (20/23)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
100% (17/17)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 6
  • Employment 6
  • Seeking Employment 2
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 2
  • Apprenticeship 1
  • Deferred University and taking a Gap Year 1
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 1

* 1 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and a further 1 attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“Prior to entering this program as a mentor I had no hands-on experience with youth or young people. I have always wanted to be involved in a mentor program but was unaware of what I wanted to do. Now I feel that I am helping the wider community by investing time in our youth and I learnt that working with Indigenous youth is something I am passionate about and hope to continue into the future.”

– Grace, mentor at Southern Cross University Lismore, studying a Bachelor of Education (Primary).

“Throughout the year I have come to see what amazing and talented kids they are. They’ve shown me that the future for Indigenous kids is looking brighter and more positive due to their face-to-face exposure to such successful Indigenous role models.”

– Tracey, mentor at Southern Cross University Lismore, studying a Bachelor of Education (Primary).

“AIME has taught me not to be ashamed and that it is important to go all the way through school.”

– Philomena, Year 10 mentee, Casino High School.

“I really enjoyed meeting and talking to other students from different schools. At AIME I learnt not to be ashamed, to speak up more and to participate more in class. Thanks to everyone who helped us attend AIME.”

– Tareena, Year 9 mentee, Maclean High School.

University of Queensland
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME UQ
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (37/37)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
95.8% (46/48)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
96.6% (28/29)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
92.0% (23/25)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 10
  • Employment 4
  • Seeking Employment 4
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 2
  • Apprenticeship 1
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 4

* 2 of these students attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“Thank you so much for helping us on our journey. It wouldn’t have been possible without you.”

– Jade, Year 9 mentee, Corinda State High School.

“Since coming to AIME, I have more confidence and now I can get up in front of my class.”

– Ben, Year 9 mentee, Kedron State High School.

“I’d like to thank everyone for their support and let them all know that they are inspirations to me. Because of them I look forward to the future and believe in myself.”

– Cecillia, Year 11 mentee, Kedron State High School.

“The students enjoyed going to the university outside of Ipswich. They loved the workshops and mixing with other students from other schools. Some students are talking about going to university now.”

– Principal, Ipswich State High School.

University of South Australia
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME UniSA
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
96.7% (58/60)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
100% (20/20)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
85.0% (17/20)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
100% (5/5)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 4
  • Employment 2

* 1 of these students attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“Since coming to AIME I have become a lot more proud of being Aboriginal. Being in a multicultural school with not many Aboriginals is hard sometimes.”

– Hope, Year 9 mentee, Parafield Gardens High School.

“Thanks for helping me. Now I am going all the way through school and aim to beat my mum and dad because they never went all the way.”

– Brittany, Year 9 mentee, Kaurna Plains School.

“Keep doing what you’re doing. It’s great to find a team to help Aboriginal kids find what they want in life and what life can bring them.”

– Nathan, Year 11 Salisbury East High School.

“What I learnt through AIME was to listen, be patient and that the older generation needs to help the younger generation. I also learnt a lot about Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander culture, which I was really interested in. AIME taught me that everyone is a leader, even if they don’t know it and that all the kids are real leaders and have their own unique wisdom. It was great watching them all grow.”

– Amy, mentor at University of South Australia, studying a Bachelor of Visual Arts.

“I think that doing something outside my studies that benefits the community has made me get outside the silo that I’ve been living in, giving me a better rounded view of the world and my own community.”

– Rebecca, mentor at University of South Australia, studying a Bachelor of Visual Arts (Photography).

University of Sydney
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME USYD
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
99.1% (107/108)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
95.2% (100/105)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
89.7% (52/58)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
89.2% (33/37)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 14
  • Employment 5
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 5
  • Apprenticeship 2
  • Deferred University and taking a Gap Year 2
  • Seeking Employment 2
  • Defence Force 1
  • Elite Sports Pathway 1
  • Volunteering 1
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 7

* 6 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and a further 1 attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“At AIME I have learnt to study hard and to never give up.”

– Chloe, Year 11 mentee, Sydney Secondary College Blackwattle Bay.

“At AIME I’ve learnt that school and your future is important.”

– Maddison, Year 9 mentee, Newtown High School of the Performing Arts.

“AIME has given our students more confidence and shown them successful Indigenous people.”

– Taliya-Via Tuiono, Teacher, Tempe High School.

“AIME has been very positive for all students. They have a greater sense of belonging and identity.”

– Frida Hristofski, Learning & Support Teacher (LaST) and Transition Advisor, Riverside Girls High School.

“Through AIME, I learnt to genuinely listen to others and the importance of simply just being a constant presence in someone else’s life. I 100% encourage every uni student to get involved with the AIME Program. It’s a unique way to facilitate genuine change at the grassroots level for Indigenous education.”

– Emmy, mentor at the University of Sydney, studying a Bachelor of Laws/International and Global Studies.

“Through my experiences at AIME, I want to learn more about the history and the contemporary life of Aboriginal Australians as well as put my hand up to volunteer more.”

– Shanaz, mentor at the University of Sydney, studying a Bachelor of Science.

University of the Sunshine Coast
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME USC
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
100% (30/30)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
92.5% (37/40)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
85.7% (18/21)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
100% (18/18)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 7
  • Employment 4
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 4
  • Defence Force 1
  • Seeking Employment 1
  • Unable to be confirmed in time for this report 4

* 2 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and a further 1 attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“Since coming to AIME I have had support and learnt more about Maths, which has helped me to pass the subject.”

– Alana, Year 10 mentee, Nambour State High School.

“The best thing I did at an AIME session was writing and performing a rap. I was not confident with it at first but then I did extremely well.”

– Abbey, Year 9 mentee, Beerwah State High School.

“I learnt a great deal from AIME. I was made more aware of just how deeply children are affected due to the many difficulties they face whether that be discrimination or racism. I no longer turn a blind eye to racist or discriminatory comments. I have become a great advocate for this program and for Indigenous awareness in general.”

– Mentor at the University of the Sunshine Coast.

“AIME has enhanced my university experience as it is a brilliant chance to grow within my social work studies in building my own understandings and abilities, and it is really beautiful to know the AIME Team and mentors. I now feel a greater sense of connectedness at uni.”

– Jane, mentor at the University of the Sunshine Coast, studying a Bachelor of Social Work.

University of Wollongong
Non-Indigenous
Students
Indigenous
Students
AIME UOW
2013 Students
Year 9-10 Progressions
100%
97.8%
99.1% (110/111)
Year 10-11 Progressions
94.3%
82.6%
93.1% (67/72)
Year 11-12 Progressions
86.8%
71.3%
88.2% (60/68)
Year 12 Completions
99.2%
71.8%
90.9% (30/33)
Post Year 12 Transitions
  • University * 20
  • TAFE / Other Registered Training Organisation (RTO) 6
  • Employment 4
  • Apprenticeship 2
  • Seeking Employment 2
  • Unemployed / Not seeking 2
  • Deferred University and taking a Gap Year 1

* 6 of these students had previously completed an AIME Program but did not attend in 2013 and a further 1 attended the Year 12 program in 2013 but did not complete 50% of the available sessions and therefore are not included in the program statistics in our National Outcomes.

“The mentors have taught me to be proud of my Aboriginality and encouraged me to go to university.”

– Teri, Year 10 mentee, St John the Evangelist High School.

“At AIME I have learnt to never give up, no matter what the situation is!”

– Shae, Year 10 mentee, Bomaderry High School.

“AIME and the mentors have taught me to believe in myself, try my hardest and take any opportunity that comes my way.”

– Lhani, Year 11 mentee, Nowra Anglican College.

“AIME has reinforced my already strong opinions on racial equality but has given me a further understanding of Indigenous youth and ways in which I can share those understandings with work colleagues and friends. Through AIME I learnt how rewarding offering my own time to help a better cause can be.”

– David, mentor at the University of Wollongong, studying a BA in Community, Culture and Environment.

“As part of the medical school we have little interaction with the wider university community, it was a good way to branch out and connect with others outside of medicine. Also being new to Wollongong it was a nice way to meet people. It’s also a great experience that is fun, rewarding and enriching. Worth every minute.”

Finance & Partnering Report

JMB @ CareerTrackers Event

In 2013, AIME achieved a modest surplus of $31,764 for the calendar year, taking the accumulated surplus to $2 million.

Revenue increased by 34% to reach $8.77 million. This growth was achieved via an increase in university contributions, corporate partnerships, federal government funding and in-kind support. This consisted of in-kind support of $3.20 million and financial revenue of $5.57 million.

In-kind support was our largest single source of revenue. The largest contributor to this is the thousands of volunteer hours committed by university students across the country. It is this incredible in-kind support that allows AIME to leverage the support of university, corporate, philanthropic, government and individual supporters to keep the cash cost per student to just under $3000 per annum.

Expenditure grew by 47% to reach $8,737,989. The growth in expenditure exceeded the growth in revenue due to the set up costs of expanding the program into two new states (Western Australia & South Australia) as well as to Rockhampton in Queensland, Ballarat in Victoria and further along the South Coast in NSW.

AIME maintained a diversified funding base (refer below) that continues into 2014.

It is the policy of AIME to achieve modest annual cash surpluses to accumulate a cash reserve to help protect our operations in future economic, political or other changes.

To all our partners who have supported AIME, thank you for walking with us.


AIME 2013 Revenue Streams
2013 Revenue Streams

Board of Directors

Geoff Lovell

Geoff LovellAIME Board Chairman

Geoff has over 20 years experience in funds management, banking, management consulting and engineering. His current role is a Division Director of Macquarie Group Limited, based in Sydney, where he has worked since 2001. Geoff is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Apart from AIME, where he became a founding Director in 2008, and has been Chairman since 2009, Geoff has served in a range of non-executive roles, including as: Chairman of the Investment Committee of the Indigenous Real Estate Investment Trust managed by Indigenous Business Australia (since 2013); Member of the Council of St Paul’s College at the University of Sydney (1995-2013, Chairman 2010-13, Treasurer 2002-09); Member of the Council of Sydney Church of England Grammar School (since 2013); and Vice-President of Sydney University Cricket Club (since 1989).

Geoff has First Class Honours Degrees in Engineering from the University of Sydney and in Politics, Philosophy and Economics (PPE) from the University of Oxford, where he was the inaugural Bradman Scholar (1990-93). He received Blues for Cricket at both universities and was Captain of the Oxford University Cricket Club in 1992.


Bronwyn Bancroft

Bronwyn BancroftAIME Board Director

Bronwyn is a descendant of the Djanbun clan of the Bundjalung nation. She works as an artist across many mediums. Over her 30 year career, Bronwyn has participated in more than 200 exhibitions, comprising of solo and group shows within Australia and overseas. Her work is held in Australian collections, such as the National Gallery of Australia, Macquarie University, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Australian Museum and Artbank, as well as in overseas collections such as Newark Museum USA, Prime Minister of Turkey, The Kelton Foundation USA, Volkerkunde Museum, Germany and Westpac USA.

Bronwyn also currently holds Board positions with: Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Cooperative, Commonwealth Bank RAP Committee and Copyright Agency.

Bronwyn has a Diploma of Visual Arts; two Masters degrees from University of Sydney, one in Studio Art and the other in Visual Art. She is currently a Doctoral candidate at the University of Western Sydney.


Professor Paul Chandler

Professor Paul ChandlerAIME Board Director

Paul is currently the Executive Director ’Early Start‘ and Pro Vice Chancellor (Inclusion & Outreach) at the University of Wollongong.

He became the first recipient of an Australian Research Council fellowship in education in 1992 and attracted over $3MIL in research funding from the ARC and industry partners over the following seven years. Regarded as an international expert in cognition and learning and a strong advocate for education, Paul is the most heavily cited educational researcher currently appointed at any Australian university.

Completing two terms as Head of School of Education at UNSW prior to his appointment as Dean of Education at the University of Wollongong in 2007, Paul was awarded as one of Australia’s ten most pre-eminent researchers in 2008. The following year he was appointed by the federal government to the Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council and is a past president of the NSW Council of Deans in Education.

Paul is a highly respected leader and has a 30-year history of working with Aboriginal communities across Australia.


Jeff McMullen AM

Jeff McMullen AMAIME Board Director

A journalist, author and film-maker for almost five decades, Jeff has been a foreign correspondent for the ABC, reporter for Four Corners and Sixty Minutes, interviewer and anchor on ABC Television, and host of televised forums on NITV.

Recent documentaries have focused on the human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their education and housing needs, and the chronic illness cluster taking so many lives.

Jeff is the Honorary CEO of Ian Thorpe’s Foundation for Youth, and has worked with singer/songwriters including Archie Roach, Kev Carmody, Paul Kelly, Shane Howard and Neil Murray on the series of iconic song books that celebrate the Indigenous Struggle for equality.

Throughout his professional life Jeff has written, filmed and campaigned around the world to improve health, education and human rights in many nations, but particularly for Indigenous people.

Jeff is also a Director of the Australian Indigenous Engineering Aid Summer School and has been prominent in the Close the Gap campaign, chairing forums in NSW, QLD, WA, VIC and NT; and is Patron of the Merry Maker’s troupe and has worked with the University of Canberra’s Healthpact Centre on program development for children.


Philip Clark AM

Philip Clark AMAIME Board Director

Philip Clark AM is a member of the J P Morgan Advisory Council, and worked with Minter Ellison from 1995 until 2005 becoming Managing Partner and CEO during that time.

Prior to this, Phil was Director and Head of Corporate with ABN Amro Australia and had previously been Managing Partner of Mallesons Stephen Jaques for 16 Years.

Phil now serves on a number of boards and advisory boards for listed and private companies including: Shopping Centres Australasia Property Group, Hunter Hall Global Value Limited, Ingenia Communities Group, M+K Lawyers Holdings Pty Ltd, Advent Lawyers Pty Ltd, and Aurora Projects Pty Ltd.

He is also on a number of government boards and advisory boards including: the Australian Government’s Education Investment Fund Advisory Board, NSW Skills Board, Royal Hobart Hospital Redevelopment Executive Steering Committee and ATN Universities Research Impact Advisory Board.

He has also held Directorships in NFP sector at High Resolves Foundation and Karen Lynch Foundation, the Garvan Foundation and St James Ethics Centre.

Phil has Bachelors degrees in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney and an MBA from Columbia University.


Mayrah Sonter

Mayrah SonterAIME Board Director

A proud Wiradjuri woman, Mayrah is a communication specialist with over 10 years experience across a range of roles. Mayrah is an accomplished events producer, TV presenter, radio producer and presenter, journalist, public relations and media specialist.

Mayrah now works at Vibe Australia where she has worked for the past five years. During this time Mayrah worked as a producer on the Deadly Sounds radio program, media officer for the Deadly Awards, TV presenter on the ’Living Strong‘ radio program, Producer of the Vibe 3on3 Basketball and Hip Hop Challenge and is now the Head of Events running all Vibe’s events throughout the country including the Vibe 3on3, Vibe Alive education festivals and the Deadly Awards.

Outside of work, Mayrah is a very passionate calisthenics coach, a unique Australian dance sport that she has been involved with for over 25 years. Mayrah also continues to work with PLC Sydney to support Indigenous students and to introduce unique opportunities for the school community to achieve a greater appreciation and understanding of Aboriginal cultures, peoples and history.


Professor Ngiare Brown

Professor Ngiare BrownAIME Board Director

Ngiare is a proud Yuin nation woman from the south coast of NSW. She was one of the first Aboriginal medical graduates in Australia, completing her medical degree at the University of Newcastle in 1992. She has a Masters in Public Health and Tropical Medicine from James Cook University and is a Fellow of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Ngiare is currently undertaking doctoral research in Aboriginal child protection at the University of New South Wales.

During her career Ngiare has held a variety of positions in education, mentoring, clinical practice, research and advocacy. She was a founding member of the Pacific Region Indigenous Doctors’ Congress (PRIDoC) and the Aboriginal Indigenous Doctors Association (AIDA) where she was also founding CEO. At the University of Sydney Ngiare was Associate Professor and Director of the Poche Centre of Indigenous Health; and Indigenous Health Adviser to the Australian Medical Association; and also worked for World Vision Australia.

Ngiare developed a program around child health and human rights at Menzies School of Health Research in Darwin, and is an inaugural member of the AHRC Close the Gap Campaign.

She has made extensive contributions to research within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and has worked over the past two decades to develop an extensive international network in Indigenous health and research. In 2005 she was named the AMA’s Woman in Medicine for her contributions to the profession.

Ngiare is currently Executive Manager Research and Senior Public Health Medical Officer at the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation, and is also Professor of Indigenous Health and Education at the University of Wollongong and also a member and Deputy Chair of the Prime Minister’s Indigenous Advisory Council.


2013 Board Meeting Attendance
Board Tenure
Meetings Attended
Geoff Lovell
Ongoing
7 / 7
Paul Chandler
Ongoing
7 / 7
Bronwyn Bancroft
Ongoing
6 / 7
Mayrah Sonter
Ongoing
6 / 7
Jeff McMullen
Ongoing
5 / 7
Philip Clark
Ongoing
5 / 7
Ngiare Brown
Ongoing
3 / 7
Tanya Hosch
Resigned 26/02/13
0 / 1

If you would like to read more, view our full 2013 Directors Report & Declaration audited by KPMG. We acknowledge the generosity of KPMG providing audit and other services at no cost to AIME.

Thanks to Partners

A big thank you to all the Partners who walked with us in 2013.


National Partners
  • The Bryan Foundation
  • Coca-Cola Australia Foundation
  • Commonwealth Bank of Australia
  • Lend Lease Management Services
  • Origin Foundation
  • Shell Development Australia
  • Telstra Foundation
  • The Trust Company Ltd
  • Third Link Investment Managers Pty Ltd
  • Virgin Australia

The Bryan Family Foundation, Coca Cola Australia Foundation Ltd, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Lend Lease Management Services, Origin Foundation, Shell Development Australia, Telstra Foundation, The Trust Company Ltd, Third Link Investment Managers Pty Ltd, Virgin Australia.


University Partners
  • Bond University
  • Central Queensland University
  • Curtin UNiversity
  • Edith Cowan Universiy
  • Federation University Australia
  • Monash University
  • Murodch University
  • RMIT University
  • Southern Cross University
  • The University of Queensland
  • University of the Sunshine Coast
  • The University of Sydney
  • University of Wollongong
  • University of South Australia

Bond University, Central Queensland University, Curtin University of Technology, Edith Cowan University, Federation University Australia, Monash University, Murdoch University, RMIT University, Southern Cross University, The University of Queensland, University of the Sunshine Coast, The University of Sydney, University of Wollongong, University of South Australia.


Other Key Partners
  • Accor Asia Pacific
  • Allens
  • AMP Foundation
  • CareerTrackers Indigenous Internship Program
  • Carnegie Foundation
  • Department of Innovation (formerly DIICSTRE)
  • Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (formerly DEEWR)
  • Envato
  • Infinitas Asset Management Ltd
  • FOXTEL
  • Google Australia Pty Ltd
  • Jurlique International Pty Ltd
  • Macquarie Group Foundation
  • Man Investments Australia Foundation
  • Sky Foundation
  • Social Ventures Australia (SVA)
  • Staples Australia Pty Ltd
  • Transfield Foundation
  • Wesfarmers Resources Ltd
Community Partners
  • Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council
  • Indigenous Business Australia
  • Matrix On Board
  • The Rotary Club of Northbridge
  • Vibe Australia
  • University of Sydney Football Club
Philanthropic Partners
  • Baly Douglass Foundation
  • Girgensohn Foundation
  • Gray Family Foundation Pty Ltd
  • Ian Thorpe’s Fountain For Youth
  • Maddocks Foundation
  • The Alexandra & Lloyd Martin Family Foundation
  • The Dyson Bequest
  • The Kimberley Foundation
  • The Snow Foundation
  • The Wyatt Benevolent Institution Inc
  • Zig Inge Foundation
In-Kind Partners
  • Atlassian
  • Baker & McKenzie
  • Bonds
  • Channel V
  • Cricket NSW
  • Eardrum Media
  • Europcar Australia & New Zealand
  • Fox Sports
  • Hidden Door
  • KPMG
  • News Limited
  • Sky News Australia / A-PAC
  • Song Division
  • Southern Cross Austereo
  • Sputnik
  • St Andrew’s College, The University of Sydney
  • St Paul’s College, The University of Sydney
  • Syba Signs
  • The General Store

NOTE: There are hundreds of other valued partners that AIME is grateful to work closely with. These partners include schools, local community organisations, land councils, organisations who provide support through payroll giving/matched giving and individuals who provide key strategic advice and opportunities.

Thank You

As we look back on the year, we see behind us a trail.
On this trail are moments in time.

  • The moment a uni student stepped up to become a mentor.
  • The moment a teacher travelled two hours to take their students to an AIME university.
  • The moment a partner worked with us to ensure we can keep doing what we’re doing.
  • The moment a uni staff member stayed back to book rooms for a session with 100 kids and uni student mentors.
  • The moment a Strut the Streets participant braved the elements (we raised over $100K!).
  • The moment a kid presented their speech as the first Indigenous Prime Minister of Australia.
  • The moment an AIME friend shared a story over dinner with their mates.

That’s the stuff that has made this year great. We thank you for making these moments – however small or big. In front of us is another trail. It hasn’t been walked in a long time, maybe never. But we can see a point on the horizon, and we know we can walk there together.

10,000 Indigenous kids annually by 2018.

We will walk it together.