Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience

Annual Report 2012

An Introduction

We're so proud to share our 2012 Annual Report with you. The results are better than we've ever seen, but before we spoil all the surprises, scroll down and take a visual journey for yourself. You ain't seen an Annual report like this one.
We promise.

Chair of the Board Report

After only eight years, AIME is now, on almost any measure, a program of national significance.

In 2012 AIME connected over 1400 Indigenous high school students with 950 volunteer university student Mentors, across 10 university sites and 121 high schools in NSW, Queensland and Victoria. And in 2013 AIME's reach extends into South Australia and Western Australia, with 7 new university sites added to the AIME Program.

This expansion has been possible largely because of the outstanding results of the program, which you will hopefully take pleasure reading about in this Annual Report. For example, of the 113 AIME students who completed Year 12 in 2012, 35 have transitioned to university, a rate of 31% which is approaching the national average of 46% for non-Indigenous students. Perhaps the most remarkable result is that for the transition from Year 10 to Year 11, historically a 'drop-out' stage for high school kids, AIME students achieved the stunning rate of 94% (277 out of 296 kids) in 2012, marginally above the national average for non-Indigenous students of 93%. Other transition rates in the AIME Program are continuing to show year-on-year improvement.

Yet the transformative impact AIME is having on our nation goes well beyond such statistics. Independent academic research has recently confirmed that, not only is the AIME Program achieving positive results in terms of school progression, school completion and university admission rates, but it is also strengthening the participating Indigenous students in terms of their resiliency, pride, sense of identity, connection with culture, aspirations for finishing school and aspirations for further study.

Above all, AIME is helping Indigenous kids believe that Indigenous means success and is inspiring future generations of Australians to recognise that Indigenous Australia represents an opportunity for all Australians to develop a sense of Australian identity that is connected to the world's oldest continuous surviving culture.

Of course, none of this has happened by accident. AIME's achievements have been the direct result of the effort and sacrifice of many people over several years.

On behalf of the AIME Board of Directors, I would like to thank our Mentors, our university partners, our high school partners, our corporate partners, and many other generous individuals and groups who have made important contributions. Our auditors KPMG, whose own generous support is acknowledged, estimate that the monetary value of in-kind support given to AIME in 2012 was an extraordinary $2.1 million.

Special thanks go to AIME's wonderful staff, whose enthusiasm remains infectious. They strive for the highest standards in everything they do, always learning and working together. For them, nothing is impossible.

And may I also thank my fellow Directors, for their tremendous engagement with the AIME Program.

We are also proud that AIME's national importance is now being recognised by financial support from the Federal Government. Importantly, this funding is being used to seed new programs to reach Indigenous kids that it would not otherwise be possible to reach, namely outreach programs on the South Coast of NSW and the Gold Coast. This is hopefully the first stage of many such programs across the country.

Yet there is so much more to be done.

So thank you for your support and we look forward to you continuing to walk with us as we keep AIME at the forefront of our national consciousness. Our Indigenous kids deserve no less.

– Geoff Lovell

What is AIME in 2013?

A unique, for purpose business that has proven to dramatically improve the chances of Indigenous children finishing school for four years running. Fusing coaching principles and mentoring to engage over 2,000 Indigenous high school students and 1,000 university students across Australia. A team of 100 staff partnered with 14 Australian universities and the likes of Google, Atlassian, Virgin Australia and Coca Cola. A platform to grow to 10,000 Indigenous kids by 2016 and see them finish school at the same rate as every Australian child. AIME is committed to unlocking the limitless potential that lies within us all.

Together with our Mentors and Mentees, AIME is building a generation of future leaders who strive to create a culture where for every step you take forward in life, you throw your hand back and bring someone with you.

We believe that Indigenous = success.


Our Mission

At AIME Indigenous means success. We work towards education equality where Indigenous students perform and finish school at the same rate as every Australian child.

We promote unity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures and build our future leaders, black and white.


Goals for 2016

  • AIME will annually engage 10,000 Indigenous students and 3,000 university Mentors across Australia.
  • AIME students will complete high school at the same rate as all Australian students.
  • Of the AIME students who complete Year 12, 100 percent will transition to further education, training or employment.
  • For our Mentors, AIME will be the best graduate development program in Australia.

Impact to Date

AIME students are turning the tide, achieving higher school completion and university progression rates than non-participants for four years running.

In 2012 the Year 9 to 12 completion rate for AIME students was 71.2 percent – exceeding the national Indigenous average of 38 percent and approaching the national non-Indigenous average of 79.9 percent.

In 2012 the Year 9 to university progression rate for AIME students was 22.1 percent – nearly six times the national Indigenous average of 3.8 percent and approaching the national non-Indigenous average of 36.8 percent.

2012 Highlights

A

AIME grew to more than 1400 Indigenous high school students who connected with over 950 volunteer university student Mentors in New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria.

Year Mentees Mentors
2005 25 25
2006 47 47
2007 100 100
2008 300 300
2009 325 500
2010 529 529
2011 787 787
2012 1,417 956

B

AIME worked with 11 university sites and 121 high schools:

  • Bond University
  • Monash University
  • Queensland University of Technology
  • RMIT University
  • Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour
  • Southern Cross University, Gold Coast
  • Southern Cross University, Lismore
  • The University of Sydney
  • University of Technology, Sydney
  • University of the Sunshine Coast
  • University of Wollongong

C

AIME signed agreements with seven new partner universities across South Australia, Western Australia, Victoria and Queensland for participation in the AIME Program in 2013:

  • Central Queensland University
  • Curtin University
  • Edith Cowan University
  • Murdoch University
  • The University of Ballarat
  • The University of Queensland
  • The University of South Australia

D

AIME welcomed the Federal Government's Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) as a supporter of the AIME Program, with a commitment of $2.5 million over three years.

This funding has enabled AIME to expand its operations to commence delivery of the Outreach Program in the South Coast of NSW and the Gold Coast region during 2013.


E

The Year 11 and 12 Leadership and Development Program launched at all AIME universities, giving students in their final years of secondary education a program focused on Year 12 completion and transition to post-schooling options.


F

The Outreach Program launched at all sites giving students from more than 50 additional schools the opportunity to participate in the AIME Program.


G

Tutor Squads were launched at nine sites deploying Mentors out into AIME schools to provide free tutoring to more than 160 Indigenous students in Years 7-12.


H

AIME held its third National Hoodie Day

Raising more than $200,000

To support the expansion of the AIME Program to WA and SA


I

The online Yearbook Portal was developed giving AIME universities and National Partners the ability to connect Year 12 AIME graduates with university placements, scholarships and graduate/training programs at partner organisations.


J

The fourth annual Strut the Streets saw nearly 500 swimwear-clad 'Strutters' walk through the Sydney CBD, raising $120,000 to support AIME's 2013 expansion plans. A host of personalities and organisations put their name to the messages of Indigenous success, including the HSBC Waratahs, Fox Sports, Bondi Rescue, Bangarra Dance Theatre, ABC 702's Adam Spencer, former dual international Wendell Sailor and NITV's Natalie Ahmat.


K

35 Year 12 AIME students transitioned into university commencing their studies in 2013.


L

AIME featured on the ABC's Australian Story, raising awareness of what AIME offers to thousands of people across Australia and telling the story of Indigenous success. This coverage led to significant interest and a huge increase in enquiries for AIME.


M

6 AIME high school students were elected as school captains, 27 AIME students were elected to their school's student representative council and 89 AIME students were elected to leadership roles within their schools and communities.


N

Recruitment for new staff members was completed with 20 new contracts signed and returned prior to the year's end, which would see the AIME Team grow to 54 full-time staff in the first few days of 2013.


O

AIME's social media presence expanded, growing from 5,866 friends on Facebook in January 2012 to 22,414 in January 2013. AIME also more than doubled its Twitter followers from 1,000 to 2,076.

National Report

In 2012, AIME continued to work with schools and universities in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria and launched Outreach Programs at every site. This Program expansion enabled 1417 students from Years 7-12 the opportunity to participate in AIME, a 80.05% increase on the number reached in 2011 of 787 students. These numbers reflect all of the students who attended a session at a university campus or at an AIME Learning Centre or Tutor Squad session. Please see below for information on how AIME calculated grade progression and completion rates for 2012.

  1. AIME did not measure Year 7 and Year 8 completion rates in 2012 as there was no structured program for these years.
  2. AIME has a minimum attendance requirement that needs to be achieved before we track students progression:
    • 50% attendance (7 sessions) at the Year 9 or Year 10 Core Program
    • Attend one of the Years 9-12 Outreach Days
    • Attend one of the Years 11 & 12 Leadership and Development Days
    • And/or attendance at least four AIME Learning Centre or Tutor Squad sessions.
  3. AIME now records the Year 11 and Year 12 completion rates and university admission rates for all sites as we have a targeted Program for these year levels.
  4. The sites included in reporting for 2012 were:
    • Sydney City – University of Sydney (commenced 2005)
    • Wollongong – University of Wollongong (commenced 2008)
    • North Coast – Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour (commenced 2009)
    • Brisbane City – Queensland University of Technology (commenced 2010)
    • Melbourne North – RMIT University (commenced 2010)
    • South East Melbourne – Monash University (commenced 2010)
    • Sunshine Coast – University of the Sunshine Coast (commenced 2011)
    • Gold Coast – Bond University & Southern Cross University, Gold Coast (commenced 2011)
    • East Sydney – University of Technology, Sydney (commenced 2011)
    • Northern NSW – Southern Cross University, Lismore (commenced 2012)

Of the 1,417 students who attended AIME, 1,018 students completed AIME as per our attendance requirements stated above. The following are the National Transition Results for the AIME 2012 Program for these 1,018 students.

Year 9 → 10 Transition: 98.6%

  • 350 students in the Year 9 Program
  • 345 transitioned to Year 10

Year 10 → 11 Transition: 93.6%

  • 296 students in the Year 10 Program
  • 277 transitioned into Year 11

Year 11 → 12 Transition: 84.7%

  • 248 AIME students in Year 11
  • 210 transitioned into Year 12

Year 12 Completion: 91.1%

  • 124 AIME students in Year 12
  • 113 completed Year 12

Year 12 → Uni Transition: 31%

  • 113 AIME students completed Year 12
  • 35 transitioned into university

National Outcomes

National Outcomes 2012

This table compares the national school progression and completion rates, as well as university admission rates, for non-Indigenous students, Indigenous students and AIME students in 2012.

This data incorporates all students from both the AIME Core and Outreach Programs and confirms that AIME has had another consecutive year of school progression and completion results that are significantly higher than the national Indigenous statistics. The AIME Program results are in accordance with an independent examination conducted by AIME's Auditors, KPMG.

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME 2012 Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 98.6%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 93.6%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 84.7%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 91.1%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46%* 10%* 31.0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 71.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 22.1%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME 2012 Students 98.6%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME 2012 Students 93.6%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME 2012 Students 84.7%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME 2012 Students 91.1%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME 2012 Students 31.0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME 2012 Students 71.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME 2012 Students 22.1%

* Refers to the percentage of students who attained an ATAR score that would gain them university entrance

Sources: ABS, Cat. No. 4221.0, Schools, Australia, 2012 & National Report to Parliament on Indigenous Education and Training, 2008 DEEWR.


National Outcomes 2009-2012

AIME 2009 Students AIME 2010 Students AIME 2011 Students AIME 2012 Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 88.0% 88.0% 97.0% 98.6%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 81.0% 87.0% 92.6% 93.6%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 92.0% 86.0% 79.0% 84.7%
Year 12 Completions 73.0% 100% 87.5% 91.1%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 38.0% 38.0% 35.7% 31.0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 48.0% 65.8% 62.7% 71.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 18.0% 25.1% 22.7% 22.1%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
AIME 2009 Students 88.0%
AIME 2010 Students 88.0%
AIME 2011 Students 97.0%
AIME 2012 Students 98.6%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
AIME 2009 Students 81.0%
AIME 2010 Students 87.0%
AIME 2011 Students 92.6%
AIME 2012 Students 93.6%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
AIME 2009 Students 92.0%
AIME 2010 Students 86.0%
AIME 2011 Students 79.0%
AIME 2012 Students 84.7%
Year 12 Completions
AIME 2009 Students 73.0%
AIME 2010 Students 100%
AIME 2011 Students 87.5%
AIME 2012 Students 91.1%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
AIME 2009 Students 38.0%
AIME 2010 Students 38.0%
AIME 2011 Students 35.7%
AIME 2012 Students 31.0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
AIME 2009 Students 48.0%
AIME 2010 Students 65.8%
AIME 2011 Students 62.7%
AIME 2012 Students 71.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
AIME 2009 Students 18.0%
AIME 2010 Students 25.1%
AIME 2011 Students 22.7%
AIME 2012 Students 22.1%

Independent Evaluation

The achievements and impacts of the AIME Outreach Program are comparable to those of the AIME Core Program, as measured by school progression rates, school completion rates and the AIME evaluation survey results. Outcomes from both programs are better than the national average. AIME positively impacted the following:

  1. The strength and resilience of Mentees
  2. Mentee pride in being Indigenous
  3. Mentees making strong connections with Indigenous peers, role models and culture
  4. Aspirations and engagement for finishing school
  5. Aspirations for continuing to further study
  6. School retention rates

To read the whole report, written by an interdisciplinary team of University of Wollongong and the University of Western Sydney researchers, please head here to download the PDF version.

AIME Site Outcomes

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Sunshine Coast

“Thank you!!! AIME is my favourite part of High School!!! I had the worst first years in high school and AIME makes everything better. I have got more motivation and confidence in my work thanks to all of you helping me and all the other Indigenous students.”
Kahli Coolwell, Year 11 Mentee, Beerwah State High School

“I wanted to be part of something worthwhile. This is the first volunteer program that has captivated me since enrolling at uni in 2008.”
Ravena Ingham, Mentor, University of the Sunshine Coast, studying Health Promotion

“I keep coming because It helps me keep strong with my identity.”
Luke Maymuru, Year 9 Mentee, Sunshine Beach State High School



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME Sunshine Coast Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 97.2%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 82.1%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 94.1%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 91.7%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 18.2%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 68.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 12.4%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME Sunshine Coast Students 97.2%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME Sunshine Coast Students 82.1%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME Sunshine Coast Students 94.1%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME Sunshine Coast Students 91.7%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME Sunshine Coast Students 18.2%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME Sunshine Coast Students 68.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME Sunshine Coast Students 12.4%

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Brisbane City

“Through AIME I hope to inspire the Indigenous youth of today to achieve their goals, dreams and aspirations and become the doctors, lawyers and leaders of tomorrow.”
William Paulson, Mentor, Queensland University of Technology, studying Engineering

“This program is as important as school.”
Ryan Duncan, Year 11 Mentee, Wavell State High School

“Thank you for running this program and trying to help sort out my life and keep me on the right track.”
Kaleb Binge, Year 12 Mentee, Wavell State High School

“I kept on coming because it was exciting. It kind of got me out of my comfort zone.”
Phillip Yeatman, Year 9 Mentee, Brisbane Boys College



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME Brisbane City Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 98.3%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 90.5%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 90%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 90%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 11.1%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 72.1%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 8%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME Brisbane City Students 98.3%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME Brisbane City Students 90.5%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME Brisbane City Students 90%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME Brisbane City Students 90%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME Brisbane City Students 11.1%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME Brisbane City Students 72.1%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME Brisbane City Students 8%

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Gold Coast

“Since coming to university, AIME has been one of the most influential extra-curricular programs I have done.”
Tawands Biti, Mentor, Bond University, International Student from Zimbabwe, studying Law and Arts

“It gave me a reason to go to school.”
Kiahra Atkinson, Year 9 Mentee, Robina High School

“I'm so much more confident after AIME.”
Gabrielle Najjar, Year 9 Mentee, Palm Beach Currumbin State High School

“I kept coming to AIME because I was able to understand more about what us Aboriginals have been through and it has made me more proud of my Indigenous background.”
Aaron Hughes, Year 10 Mentee, Keebra Park High School

“AIME is a great program and made me far more confident and proud to embrace my heritage.”
Tyler Trappett, Year 10 Mentee, Elanora State High School

“I got that giving up wasn't a good enough excuse to not go to Year 12.”
Joshua McLaughlin-Smith, Year 11 Mentee, Keebra Park State High School

“It's great to know I'm helping to make a positive change to the future.”
Kristy Harris, Mentor, Bond University



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME Gold Coast Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 97.8%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 80%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 33.3%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 78.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 26.1%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME Gold Coast Students 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME Gold Coast Students 97.8%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME Gold Coast Students 80%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME Gold Coast Students 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME Gold Coast Students 33.3%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME Gold Coast Students 78.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME Gold Coast Students 26.1%

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Northern NSW

“I had wanted to be a part of AIME since I heard about it being operated at SCU Coffs Harbour but as I live near Lismore, it was too far to travel. Good that's it now here! Also, it can be (I know it sounds ridiculous) difficult to meet or interact with Indigenous Australians if you are non-Indigenous. AIME offers not only the opportunity to give back but build connections and to change (hopefully) the future for all Australians.”
Julie-Ann Paredes, Mentor, University of Sydney, attending AIME North Coast Lismore, PhD Candidate

“Indigenous culture is the oldest in the history of the world. I am 35 years old, have attended 3 universities and private school and know nothing of my adopted ancestry. This is shameful.”
Jason Revell, Mentor, Southern Cross University Lismore, studying Bachelor of Pharmacy (completed), MBA (midway), LLB (midway)

“The AIME Program taught me that no matter what or who you are, you can succeed.”
Caitlin Hammond, Year 9 Mentee, Lismore High School

“I learnt not to be shame of who I am. If you try hard enough you will succeed.”
Talluah Close, Year 10 Mentee, Casino High School



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME Northern NSW Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 92.9%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 73.7%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 68.5%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 0%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME Northern NSW Students 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME Northern NSW Students 92.9%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME Northern NSW Students 73.7%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME Northern NSW Students 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME Northern NSW Students 0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME Northern NSW Students 68.5%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME Northern NSW Students 0%

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North Coast

“I'm doing AIME as I hope to watch history change.”
Kamla Ruthnam, Mentor, Southern Cross University Coffs Harbour, studying Bachelor of Business

“Before I came to AIME I was very seriously considering dropping out of school in Year 11. Now I realise how important it is to finish Year 12 and complete my HSC, so I would just like to say thank you AIME!”
Darryl Lockwood, Year 11 Mentee, Coffs Harbour High School

“Thank you all so much for helping me in some way to achieve my goals and helping me gain courage to continue on to finish Year 12.”
Maddie Duroux, Year 12 Mentee, Woolgoolga High School



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME North Coast Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 87%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.9% 69.6% 94.7%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 80%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 65.9%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 0%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME North Coast Students 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME North Coast Students 87%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME North Coast Students 94.7%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME North Coast Students 80%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME North Coast Students 0%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME North Coast Students 65.9%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME North Coast Students 0%

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East Sydney

“I was tutored in this program and I enjoyed it. The Program Manager (Belinda) basically got me to where I am today (university).”
Blake Hayward, Mentor, The University of Technology, Sydney, studying Environmental Science

“I was a Mentee and AIME was amazing.”
Ivor Sebastian-Rigney, Mentor, The University of Technology, Sydney, studying Law

“Through AIME I have learnt self respect, confidence and to be nice to everyone no matter who they are.”
Lucas Wallace, Year 9 Mentee, JJ Cahill Memorial High School

“From AIME I learnt that I should make the most out of life.”
Isaiah Terangi, Year 9 Mentee, Cranbrook School

“This year has been challenging, educational, fun, rewarding, motivating and an experience like no other.”
Keisha Pickin, AIME Mentor, University of Technology, Sydney

“The AIME Program significantly changes you as a person.”
Isabela Perkins, Mentor, University of Technology, Sydney



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME East Sydney Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 100%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 83.3%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 91.7%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 22.7%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 76.4%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 17.3%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME East Sydney Students 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME East Sydney Students 100%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME East Sydney Students 83.3%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME East Sydney Students 91.7%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME East Sydney Students 22.7%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME East Sydney Students 76.4%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME East Sydney Students 17.3%

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Sydney City

“AIME has been the highlight of my university experience since becoming involved in 2010.”
James Goswell, Mentor, The University of Sydney

“AIME demystifies uni.”
Leanne Jamieson, Practicum Teacher, Marrickville High School

“AIME you inspired me in a way I haven't been inspired before.”
Martika Walford, Year 9 Mentee, St Scholastica's College

“From the AIME Program, I learnt to be proud of my Aboriginality and I learnt to strive for what I want and what I believe in.”
Joshua Fazldeen, Year 10 Mentee, Ashfield Boys High School

“I can finally see my future thanks to you AIME.”
James Bridges, Year 10 Mentee, Ashfield Boys High School



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME Sydney City Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 97.2%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.9% 69.6% 86.7%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 65%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 84.3%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 54.8%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME Sydney City Students 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME Sydney City Students 97.2%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME Sydney City Students 86.7%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME Sydney City Students 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME Sydney City Students 65%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME Sydney City Students 84.3%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME Sydney City Students 54.8%

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Wollongong

“I have a strong interest in Indigenous history, arts and knowledge and am pursuing a career in Indigenous Law. I hope to get increased leadership abilities, communication skills and a better understanding of Indigenous Australia.”
Aaron Strickland, Mentor, University of Wollongong, studying Law

“AIME is rewarding, fun and inspiring. If mentoring for AIME was a mandatory requirement of university, Australia would be a far more understanding, tolerant and harmonious country.”
Aaron Strickland, Mentor, University of Wollongong

“I'm so proud to be a part of this team. AIME does amazing work and is making a big difference to not only the Indigenous kids but to the uni students who join as well.”
Shelley Tapham, Mentor, University of Wollongong

“AIME has made me believe I can achieve any of my goals, no matter how big. All I need is to believe in myself and work hard.”
Morgan Kill, Year 10 Mentee, Kanahooka High School

“I learnt more about Indigenous culture and the struggles that so many Indigenous Australians are facing daily.”
Benjamin Pearce, Mentor, University of Wollongong

“The AIME Program makes volunteering accessible and convenient; two important elements for a busy uni student!”
Carrie Thompson, Mentor, University of Wollongong

“AIME is a way to give back to Australia and Indigenous Australia, a way of creating a better and more equal future while simply having fun and making new great friends.”
Mitchell Sarkis, Mentor, University of Wollongong



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME Wollongong Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 96.1%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 83.3%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 78.1% 70.6%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 25%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 56.5%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 14.1%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME Wollongong Students 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME Wollongong Students 96.1%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME Wollongong Students 83.3%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME Wollongong Students 70.6%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME Wollongong Students 25%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME Wollongong Students 56.5%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME Wollongong Students 14.1%

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Melbourne North

“(Through AIME) I learnt what it takes to be a leader.”
Evander Mitchell, Year 10 Mentee, Reservoir High School

“(Because of AIME I learnt) that if I want something I need to go seize it with my own hands.”
Hayden McEwan, Year 11 Mentee, Hume Central Secondary College

“Thank you for believing in me and the support given... there are kids with no direction that people like you can help.”
Iyesha Betteridge, Year 12 Mentee, Staughton College

“I learnt something about what situations Indigenous people face, the context to which their culture influences them and the need for organisations like AIME to direct and encourage people.”
Jean Christie, Mentor, RMIT University

“(At AIME) I was honoured to meet some awesome Indigenous people who SMASH the stereotypes!”
Michael Waters, Mentor, RMIT University

“One of my Year 10 students wanted to leave school at the end of Year 10. Today she said to me that she now wants to complete Year 12 and go to university. She wanted to be a hairdresser but now wants to work with young people in some capacity.”
Amanda Xavier, Student Support Services, Melton Secondary College



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME Melbourne North Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 95.5%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 76.5%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 55.6%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 73.1%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 40.6%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME Melbourne North Students 100%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME Melbourne North Students 95.5%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME Melbourne North Students 76.5%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME Melbourne North Students 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME Melbourne North Students 55.6%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME Melbourne North Students 73.1%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME Melbourne North Students 40.6%

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South East Melbourne

“I really wanted to get involved with the Indigenous community and work towards reducing existing inequalities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities. I'm studying medicine but education is something I really wanted to be involved in.”
Swetha Prabhakaran, Mentor, Monash University, studying Medicine

“AIME is not only relevant to my professional skills but also connects with the reason I am studying to be a teacher at Monash: to make a difference in kids lives and to inspire, guide and help them grow.”
Maddilyne Ruth Hammet, Mentor, Monash University, studying a Bachelor of Education (Secondary) and a Bachelor of Arts

“(AIME) keeps me motivated to try and do well at school... it sets me up for the future.”
Bernard Patrick Kelly, Year 11 Mentee, Melbourne Grammar School



Site Outcomes

National Outcomes Non-Indigenous Students Indigenous Students AIME South East Melbourne Students
Year 9 → 10 Progressions 100% 97.1% 89.7%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions 93% 78.3% 94.7%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions 86.1% 69.6% 85%
Year 12 Completions 99.2% 71.8% 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions 46% 10% 40%
Year 9 → 12 Completions 79.9% 38% 72.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions 36.8% 3.8% 28.9%
Year 9 → 10 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 100%
Indigenous Students 97.1%
AIME South East Melbourne Students 89.7%
Year 10 → 11 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 93%
Indigenous Students 78.3%
AIME South East Melbourne Students 94.7%
Year 11 → 12 Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 86.1%
Indigenous Students 69.6%
AIME South East Melbourne Students 85%
Year 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 99.2%
Indigenous Students 71.8%
AIME South East Melbourne Students 100%
Year 12 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 46%
Indigenous Students 10%
AIME South East Melbourne Students 40%
Year 9 → 12 Completions
Non-Indigenous Students 79.9%
Indigenous Students 38%
AIME South East Melbourne Students 72.2%
Year 9 → Uni Progressions
Non-Indigenous Students 36.8%
Indigenous Students 3.8%
AIME South East Melbourne Students 28.9%

Mentor Participation

Mentors are the backbone of the AIME Program. Since the program started in 2005, more than 3,000 Mentors have put their hand up to be part of change in Australia through AIME.

The following table provides the number of Mentors who were selected, trained and participated at each site. The number of in-kind hours these Mentors provided through volunteering their time at AIME includes Mentor Training sessions, pre and post session briefs and participation in the AIME Program sessions.

AIME Sites Number of Mentors Number of In-Kind Mentor Hours
Sunshine Coast 109 973
Brisbane City 120 1,523
Gold Coast 68 805
Northern NSW 33 570
Coffs Harbour 39 593
East Sydney 76 1,079
Sydney City 112 1,823
Wollongong 172 2,391
Melbourne North 105 1,476
South East Melbourne 122 2,029
Totals 956 13,262

Finance & Partnering Report

Director Report

2012 saw a record number of students participate in the program and this resulted in a significant increase in both Revenue and Expenditure.

In 2012 we also adopted formal policies and controls to reliably measure in-kind support. This has resulted in an additional $2.1 million now being included in Revenue & Expenses in our Financial Statements. This resulted in a significant proportional increase in both Revenue & Expenses.

Revenue doubled from 2011 to increase to $6,528,467. Expenditure grew proportionally and doubled to reach $5,957,001. This resulted in a surplus of $571,466. If the $2.1 million of in-kind support was not included (as per 2011 Financial Statements) then the increase in revenue would have been 35%. In future years our in-kind support that can be reliably measured will be included in our Revenue & Expenses.

It is the policy of AIME to budget for modest annual cash surpluses, particularly during our growth phase. This allows us to build a cash balance that gives a level of freedom in continuing to develop and expand operations such as the 2013 expansion into South Australia and Western Australia. It also ensures that our operations can continue should there be any unforeseen timing issues with cash receipts.


Funding & Support

AIME's operations were facilitated by the support of universities as well as corporate and philanthropic foundations and fundraising that allowed the program to be delivered and grow through 2012. We also welcome for the first time the support of DEEWR and the Federal Government with a grant of $2.5 million over 3 years.

Our largest source of support in the 2012 calendar year was the $2.1 million we received through in-kind support. The breakdown of revenue is below:

8%Philanthropic

33%In-kind

2%Interest/Other

3%Social Enteprise
(National Hoodie Day)

19%Universities

7%Individuals/
Fundraising

8%Government

20%Corporate

  • 33% In-kind
  • 20% Corporate
  • 19% Universities
  • 8% Government
  • 8% Philanthropic
  • 7% Individuals/Fundraising
  • 3% Social Enteprise (National Hoodie Day)
  • 2% Interest/Other

Full Financial Report

Our full 2012 Financial Statements audited by KPMG can be found at here. We acknowledge the generosity of KPMG providing audit and other services at no cost to AIME.


Thank You

They say to make your way in business you should surround yourself with smart people. We love working with the best in business – but we also reckon it's a pretty special thing to be walking with the dreamers.

Our partners are more than financial supporters. They are believers – and together we share a dream that nothing is impossible.

Thank you for walking with us

Thanks to Partners

Universities


University of Sydney Residential Colleges


National Partners


Community Partners

  • Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council NSW
  • Accor
  • Allens
  • AMP Foundation
  • Ann Johnson
  • ANZ Trustees Foundation
  • Atlassian
  • Australian Philanthropic Services
  • Australian Theatre for Young People
  • Bangarra Dance Company
  • Baker & McKenzie
  • Career Trackers
  • Coopers Investors
  • Dyson Bequest
  • Envato
  • Eureka Benevolent Foundation Ltd
  • Foxtel
  • Generation One
  • Girgensohn Foundation
  • Goldman Sachs
  • Gray Family Foundation
  • GWS Giants
  • Heaps Decent
  • Indigenous Leadership Development Institute
  • Infinitas Asset Management
  • Ingrid R. Davis and Family
  • James N. Kirby Foundation
  • Kimberley Foundation
  • KPMG
  • Maddocks Foundation
  • Man Investments
  • Matrix on Board
  • Merivale
  • Myer Family Company Ltd
  • National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy
  • National Centre of Indigenous Excellence
  • NSW Cricket
  • NSW Waratahs
  • Staples
  • Supply Council (formerly AIMSC)
  • Syba Signs
  • Talent2
  • The Fred P Archer Charitable Trust
  • The Sky Foundation
  • ThoughtWorks
  • Tibra Capital Foundation
  • Transfield Foundation
  • Tribal Warrior
  • Trust Foundation
  • University Co-operative Bookshop Limited
  • Vaux Family Foundation
  • Vonwiller Foundation
  • Zig Inge Group

Board of Directors

Geoff LovellDirector (Chair)

Geoff is a Division Director of Macquarie Group Limited, based in Sydney, where he has worked for over eleven years. In total Geoff has over 20 years experience in banking, funds management, management consulting and engineering.

Geoff has First Class Honours Degrees in Engineering from the University of Sydney and in Politics, Philosophy and Economics (PPE) from the University of Oxford, where he was the inaugural Bradman Scholar (1990-93). He received Blues for Cricket at both universities and was Captain of Oxford University Cricket Club in 1992.

Geoff is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Until retiring in March 2013, Geoff was Chairman of the Council of St Paul's College at the University of Sydney, where he had been a Fellow for 18 years. He remains a Director of the St Paul's College Foundation and is a Vice-President of Sydney University Cricket Club.


Bronwyn BancroftDirector

Bronwyn is a descendant of the Djanbun clan of the Bundjalung nation. She works as an artist across many mediums. Over her 30 year career, Bronwyn has participated in more than 200 exhibitions, comprising of solo and group shows within Australia and overseas. Bronwyn's work is held in Australian collections, such as the National Gallery of Australia, Macquarie University, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery of Western Australian, Australian Museum and Artbank, as well as in overseas collections such as Newark Museum USA, Prime Minister of Turkey, The Kelton Foundation USA, Volkerkunde Museum, Germany, Westpac USA. Bronwyn currently holds Board positions with: Tranby Aboriginal College, Visual Arts Copyright Collection Agency (Viscopy) and Copyright Agency Limited (CAL).

Bronwyn has a Diploma of Visual Arts; two Masters degrees from the University of Sydney, one in Studio Art and the other in Visual Art. She is currently a Doctoral candidate at the University of Western Sydney.


Jeff McMullenDirector

A journalist, author and film-maker for over 45 years, an ABC foreign correspondent, Four Corners and Sixty Minutes reporter, and the host of the 33 part issue series on ABC Television, “Difference of Opinion”. Throughout his professional life Jeff McMullen has written, filmed and campaigned around the world to improve the health, education and human rights of Indigenous people. He is the Honorary CEO of Ian Thorpe's Fountain for Youth, developing early learning programs and the Literacy Backpack project in 22 remote Indigenous communities over the past nine years.

As a Director of AIME, or Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience, Jeff has helped grow this highly successful education movement connecting university undergraduates as mentors for Aboriginal high-school students in urban areas. Jeff is also a Director of the Australian Indigenous Engineering Aid Summer School program that is building opportunities in tertiary education.

As a Trustee of the Jimmy Little Foundation, Jeff also works with Aboriginal doctors and medical services to improve dialysis and introduce the nutrition program, “Uncle Jimmy's Thumbs Up”, aimed at reduction and prevention of the epidemic of chronic illness.


Mayrah SonterDirector

A proud Wiradjuri woman, Mayrah is a communication specialist with over 10 years experience across a range of roles. Mayrah is an accomplished events producer, TV presenter, radio producer and presenter, journalist, public relations and media specialist.

Mayrah began her education at Redfern Public School where she was a school captain before completing her secondary education at the Presbyterian Ladies' College, Sydney.

Mayrah has a Bachelor of Arts Degree (Communications) and is currently completing a Masters of Journalism through the University of Technology, Sydney.

Mayrah now works at Vibe Australia where she has worked for the past five years. During this time Mayrah worked as a producer on the Deadly Sounds radio program, media officer for the Deadly Awards, TV presenter on the 'Living Strong' radio program, Producer of the Vibe 3on3 Basketball and Hip Hop Challenge and is now the Head of Events running all Vibe's events throughout the country including the Vibe 3on3, Vibe Alive education festivals and the Deadly Awards.

Mayrah is also a member of the City of Sydney Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Panel.


Paul ChandlerDirector

Despite being labelled stupid at school and nicknamed “spare” for inability to “fit in” at school. Paul became the first person in his family to finish primary school. He then went on to complete high school, two undergraduate degrees at Sydney University and two postgraduate degrees at UNSW. After completing his undergraduate qualifications, Paul started his education career in 1987 teaching science and mathematics in his local community at Matraville High School. A chance meeting outside UNSW led him to pursue a Master of Science in Psychology and PhD in Education at that institution and in 1992 he became the first academic (Aboriginal or Non-Aboriginal) from education to ever receive an Australian Research Council post- doctoral research fellowship.

At UNSW, he built a reputation as innovative researcher and lecturer and a strong advocate for Indigenous education. He chaired the review that led to the creation of Nura Gili (“place of light and fire”) at UNSW. He completed two terms as Head of School of Education before being appointed Dean of Education at the University of Wollongong. Today, Paul is regarded as an international expert in cognition and learning and currently is the most cited educational researcher appointed at any Australian University. In 2008, at a National Press Club event, Paul was awarded as one of Australia's ten most pre-eminent researchers.

Paul's real passion is working with young people and for 25 years, he has been heavily involved in improving Indigenous outcomes in education and health through an array of community driven projects and initiatives. In particular, Paul is deeply committed to reaching more people in the early years and has been instrumental in developing the new Bachelor of Education – The Early Years degree at the University of Wollongong to commence in 2009.

Paul now lives at nearby Towradgi Beach with his wife Michelle and two children Tahnee (6) and Jed (4).


Philip ClarkDirector

Philip Clark AM is a member of the J P Morgan Advisory Council. He was Managing Partner and CEO of Minter Ellison and worked with that firm from 1995 until June 2005. Prior to joining Minter Ellison, Phil was Director and Head of Corporate with ABN Amro Australia and prior to that he was Managing Partner of Mallesons Stephen Jaques for 16 years. Earlier in his career he worked with a Pratt Industries subsidiary and with Shell Australia.

Phil now serves on a number of boards and advisory boards. His appointments include:

  • Member of the JP Morgan Advisory Council
  • Chair of the Australian Government's Education Investment Fund Advisory Board, one of the three Nation Building Funds
  • Chair of Shopping Centres Australasia Property Group
  • Director of Ingenia Communities Group
  • Chair of M+K Lawyers Holdings Pty Ltd
  • Chair of Advent Lawyers Pty Ltd
  • Chair of Aurora Projects Pty Ltd
  • Chair of the Tasmanian Infrastructure Council

His work in the not-for profit sector includes positions as a Director of St James Ethics Centre, High Resolves Foundation and of two scholarship charities, one of which is the Karen Lynch Foundation which provides scholarships to indigenous students. Phil also served as a Director of the Garvan Foundation from 2005 to 2008.


Ngiare BrownDirector

Dr Ngiare Brown is an Aboriginal woman from the south coast of NSW and one of the first half-dozen identified Aboriginal medical graduates in Australia. Currently working at the Australian Indigenous Doctor's Association, Dr Brown has a clinical background in acute care and primary health, as well as experience in medical education, policy and research. Dr Brown has previously been Indigenous Health Advisor to the Federal Australian Medical Association and was Foundation CEO of the Australian Indigenous Doctor's Association. She has recently undertaken doctoral studies in human rights, human rights law and public health.


Tanya HoschDirector

Tanya works primarily in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs and other areas of social policy. Tanya is actively involved on a number of Boards and Councils and holds a position as a Visiting Research Fellow with the University of Technology, Sydney. Tanya is also employed as Executive Director of a Governance project aiming to establish the Australian Indigenous Governance Institute.


Shane HoustonDirector

Shane Houston is a Gangulu man from Central Queensland. He has worked in Aboriginal Affairs for more than 35 years mainly in the health and employment areas. Shane has held a range of positions at local, state, national and international levels including thirteen years in senior public sector management roles and a stint with the World Council. He completed his PhD at Curtin University in 2003 graduating with a Chancellor's Commendation. Act. In 2010, Shane have been appointed to the role of Deputy Vice Chancellor (Indigenous Strategy and Services) at Sydney University. Shane also holds the position of Executive Director of Systems Performance and Aboriginal Policy at Menzies School of Health Research.


2012 Board Meeting Attendance

Director's Name 2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012
Bronwyn Bancroft Ongoing Attended 6 of 6 Possible Meetings
Geoff Lovell Ongoing Attended 6 of 6 Possible Meetings
Jeff McMullen Ongoing Attended 5 of 6 Possible Meetings
Paul Chandler Ongoing Attended 5 of 6 Possible Meetings
Philip Clark Ongoing Attended 5 of 6 Possible Meetings
Tanya Hosch Ongoing Attended 3 of 6 Possible Meetings
Shane Houston Resigned 28/06/12 Attended 0 of 3 Possible Meetings
Mayrah Sonter Appointed 07/05/12 Attended 4 of 5 Possible Meetings
Ngiare Brown Appointed 07/08/12 Attended 1 of 2 Possible Meetings
Bronwyn Bancroft
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Ongoing
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 6 of 6 Possible Meetings
Geoff Lovell
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Ongoing
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 6 of 6 Possible Meetings
Jeff McMullen
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Ongoing
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 5 of 6 Possible Meetings
Paul Chandler
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Ongoing
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 5 of 6 Possible Meetings
Philip Clark
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Ongoing
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 5 of 6 Possible Meetings
Tanya Hosch
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Ongoing
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 3 of 6 Possible Meetings
Shane Houston
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Resigned 28/06/12
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 0 of 3 Possible Meetings
Mayrah Sonter
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Appointed 07/05/12
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 4 of 5 Possible Meetings
Ngiare Brown
2012 Appointed / Resigned Date Appointed 07/08/12
Board Meetings held Feb – Dec 2012 Attended 1 of 2 Possible Meetings

Directors Report & Declaration

Our 2012 Directors Report & Declaration audited by KPMG can be found at here. We acknowledge the generosity of KPMG providing audit and other services at no cost to AIME.

Thanks to Everyone

Together with our Mentors and Mentees, our staff, university partners, our friends at leading businesses in Australia and around the world, and a host of others, we're building a generation of future leaders who dream of creating a culture where for every step you take forward in life, you throw your hand back and bring someone with you.

It's with your support that Indigenous kids are stepping up to change their teachers' and fellow students' perceptions, lift their parents' hope, and inspire a generation of younger Indigenous kids to see that if they are willing to work hard and believe, they will shatter the mould that has been cast for them.

We have a platform to grow to 10,000 Indigenous kids by 2016 and see them finish school at the same rate as every Australian child. Together we will see Australians dancing to a new beat of Indigenous success.

But this is not where we will rest. Together we share a dream that nothing is impossible. And we promise, the best is yet to come.